snaith//Sonnet 43 By Elizabeth Barrett Browning

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  • Sonnet 43
    • Content
      • She is expressing her intense love for Robert Browning
        • She fell in love with Robert Browning and she wrote this poem to express her love fore him.
      • Browning 'count[s]' the ways that she loves him
        • 'How do I love thee? Let me count the ways'
    • Social Context
      • Her own love
        • She fell in love with Robert Browning and she wrote this poem to express her love fore him.
      • Browning suffered from a life-long illness
        • Meaning she may want to express the love she feels without wasting any time.
    • Mood and Emotion
      • Loving
      • eternal
        • 'I shall but love thee better after death'
      • Religious
        • 'with a love I seemed to lose With my lost Saints'
        • 'And, if God choose'
          • She questions her faith as she may believe God can bring the two together in the afterlife
      • personal
        • 'I love thee'
        • 'How do I love thee?'
          • Browning is telling her lover how she feels, meaning the tone is very soft and personal.
            • 'I love thee'
    • Attitude
      • Browning presents the idea of love as powerful and all-encompassing
        • 'I love thee to the depth and breadth and height'
          • Browning is implying that, no matter what, she will love him because all of her loves him
      • Her love enables her to reach otherwise impossible extremes
        • 'For the ends of Being and ideal Grace'
        • 'I love thee to the depth and breadth and height'
          • Browning is implying that, no matter what, she will love him because all of her loves him
    • Language
      • Triplet
        • 'depth and breadth and height'
      • assonance
        • 'Praise' and 'faith'
          • Unusual because the poem is about perfect love, however, the rhyme scheme is not so perfect
      • repetition
        • 'I love thee' x8
      • punctuation
        • implies passion on the end of lines
      • Rhetorical Question
        • 'How do I love thee?'
          • Implies that Browning is talking to her lover

Comments

Megan Garbutt

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This is amazing! 

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