Social Psychological Theories of Aggression

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  • Created by: PickJ
  • Created on: 27-04-14 13:20
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  • Social Psychological Theories
    • AO1
      • Deindiviuation
        • Diener's 4 factors
          • External Focus
          • Increased Arousal
          • Strong Group Feelings
          • Sense of Anonymity
        • Real Life Example
          • KKK
            • Increased arousal blacks getting right to vote
              • Strong group feelings of white supremacy
                • Sense of anonymity by wearing smocks
                  • External focus of abusing and killing blacks
        • Happens When
          • Inhibitions are lowered not governed by own morals
            • Makes less likely to follow laws and social norms
              • Dont take responsibility for actions
                • Lack of self awareness leads to aggressive behaviour
        • AO2
          • Supporting Evidence
            • Deindividuation leads to aggression
              • In Zimbardo's lab experiment female undergraduates were required to deliver electric shocks to aid learning
                • 4 women experimental group wore bulky lab coats and white hoods, were not introduced, could not see each other, and given instructions as a group
                  • Control group wore own clothes, were introduced, could see each other, and given instructions individiually
                    • Found experimental group gave more painful shocks
                      • Findings add validity to deindividuation as an explanation of aggression
                        • Showing that reduced self awareness can lead to increased aggression
          • Contradictory evidence
            • Deindividuation leads to aggression
              • Johnson & Downing carried out variation of Zimbardo's experiment
                • Participants wore either masks & overalls similar to KKK, nurse's uniforms, or own clothes.
                  • Most shocks given by participants in masks & overalls
                    • Fewer shocks given by those in nurse's uniforms than own clothes
    • AO1
      • Social Learning Theory
        • Imitate aggressive behavior by observing aggressive role model
          • E.g. Parents & Celebs
        • 4 Criteria
          • Reporduction
            • Being physically able to do the act
              • E.g. Practicing on a younger sibling
          • Retention
            • Remembering a wrestling move from TV
          • Motivation
          • Attention
        • Additional things to help motivate aggression
          • Vicarious Reinforcement
            • Watching a role model be rewarded for an aggressive act
          • Similar Characteristics
            • Gender
          • Self Efficacy
            • Individuals belief can do aggressive act and achieve desired results
        • AO2
          • Supporting Evidence
            • Origional Bobo Doll Study
              • Bandura compared aggression levels in 2 groups
                • Observed an aggressive role model & observed a passive interaction
                  • Those exposed to aggressive role model showed more aggressive imitation
                    • Imitation highest in boys who observed an aggressive male role model
          • Lacks Validity
            • Bandura's experiment lacks internal validity due to high levels of demand characteristics
              • Children knew on some level supposed to act aggressively
                • "Look Mummy, there's the doll we have to hit"
                  • Argued SLT cannot be accepted as a valid explanation aggressive behaviours in children
                    • Studies may not be an accurate reflection of aggression outside the lab
    • IDA
      • Gender biased
  • Cannavale found deindividuated males act more aggressively but females don't
    • Suggesting that males more prone to losing inhibitions than females
      • May not offer a complete explanation of aggressive behaviour in both genders

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