Smoking Addiction

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  • Created by: Augusta
  • Created on: 26-12-12 19:07
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  • Smoking Addiction (AO2)
    • Shiffmann (2009)
      • About two-thirds of smokers were occasional smokers and only smoked in certain situations.
    • Shields (1962)
      • 42 MZ twin pairs reared apart.
        • 33 twin pairs were concordant (they either both smoked or both didn't).
          • Massive genetic link.
            • 9 twin pairs were discordant (one smoked and the other didn't).
              • 42 MZ twin pairs reared apart.
                • 33 twin pairs were concordant (they either both smoked or both didn't).
                  • Massive genetic link.
                    • 9 twin pairs were discordant (one smoked and the other didn't).
      • Buka et al (2003)
        • Women who smoked during pregnancy doubled the risk of their child becoming addicted to tobacco if they DID try it.
        • An expectant mother smoking during pregnancy did not increase likelihood that her child will later try smoking or become a regular smoker.
          • Women who smoked during pregnancy doubled the risk of their child becoming addicted to tobacco if they DID try it.
        • Data from over 1,248 women aged 17-39.
      • Mayeux (2008)
        • Boys who smoked aged 16 were more likely to be popular two years later.
      • National Institute on Drug Abuse (2005)
        • 90% of American smokers started as adolescents.
        • Mainly due to observation and imitation of peers.
          • 90% of American smokers started as adolescents.
        • This provides support for SLT and the role of observation of similar models as a valid explanation of smoking addiction.
      • Brynner (1969)
        • Media images of smoking created perceptions of smoking as being attractive and tough.
        • Social Learning Theory
          • Media images of smoking created perceptions of smoking as being attractive and tough.
      • Lader and Matheson (1992)
        • Children of parents who smoked twice as likely to smoke compared to children whose parents did not smoke.
        • Murray et al (1984)
          • If parents hold a strong negative attitude towards smoking, then their children are seven times less likely to begin smoking compared to children of parents with less negative attitudes towards smoking.
      • Mosbach and Lenenthal (1988)
        • Strong support for the idea that poor school performance, low self-esteem and low involvement in sport linked to smoking.
      • Fidler (2009)
        • Examined smoking trends in UK and found that smoking was associated with social and economic disadvantage - poorest smoker having highest nicotine intake.
      • Khaled et al (2009)
        • Long term smoking has an adverse effect on mood because it alters brain neurochemistry.
        • Current smokers had the highest incidence of depression, where as people had never smoked had lowest incidence of depression.

    Comments

    Charmain Pearce


    great points : short and sweet

    MrsMacLean

    Nicely detailed without going over the top! A very useful mind map!

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