Sleep

A mindmap showing different aspects of sleep including stages, brain structures and proteins involved.

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  • Created by: Nathan
  • Created on: 13-03-13 15:49
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  • Sleep
    • Brain Structures
      • Reticular Activating System (RAS)
        • Column of neurons in midbrain
        • Active when awake, quiet when asleep
        • Shows alpha waves on EEG when activated
      • Locus Coeruleus
        • Found in the pons
        • Increases animal's sensitivity to environment
        • Active when awake
        • Decreased activity = onset of REM
      • Raphe Nucleus
        • Part of medulla & pons
        • Important role in wakefulness
          • Blocks activity of REM-associated neurons
      • Suprachiasmatic Nuclei (SCN)
        • Regulates circadian rhythms
        • Input from retinal fibres
      • Cholinergic Mesopontine nuclei
        • Activates neurons in thalamus involved in wakefulness
        • Suppresses neurons involved in sleep
        • Found in midbrain
    • Stages of Sleep
      • Stage 1
        • Alpha waves
        • H/R slows,  muscle tension reduces
        • Lasts several mins
      • Stage 2
        • Sleep spindles
        • Theta waves
        • K-complexes = sharp -'ve EEG potentials
        • ~50% of sleep spent in stage 2
      • Stage 3
        • Delta waves
        • Large amplitude, slow waves
        • Sleep spindles cont.
      • Stage 4
        • Delta waves cont.
        • Deep sleep
        • Sleep walking and other anomalies occur
      • REM
        • Dreaming occurs
        • Lots of brain activity
        • Muscles paralysed
    • Protein-protein interactions
      • Clock and Cycle proteins made by SCN cells
        • Clock+Cycle= dimer
          • Dimer binds to per and cry genes
            • Per and Cry genes make Per and Cry proteins
              • Per+Cry+Tau= complex
                • Per/Cry/Tau complex binds to Per and Cry genes and silences
                  • Per/Cry/Tau degrades after ~20h
        • Regulates circadian rhythms
  • Active when awake, quiet when asleep

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