Act 3 Scene 15

HideShow resource information
View mindmap
  • Scene XV: Witwoud and Sir Wilfull
    • Spoken Language Features
      • Register
        • Sir W's dialect causes him to stand out against more formal talk
          • "Oons" "by'r lady"
        • Difference in register of Sir W and Mrs Marwood's first utterances in the scene immediately highlight difference
          • "Oons" and "I don't think a knows his own name" VS "Your brother is not behindhand in forgetfulness"
        • Sir W's accent becomes more pronounced after he recognises Witwoud
          • "yea by'r lady but 'tis"
          • shifts from "you" to "thee"
      • Terms of Address
        • Marwood calls Witwoud "Mr Witwoud", which may be to emphasise how his  status is lower than his brother
        • Sir Wilfull's excessive use of honourifics show how he is conscious of politeness
          • "sir"
      • Paralinguistic features
        • Petulant uses a laughter-like sound to show his disdain for Sir Wilfull
          • "Hem, hem."
        • Witwoud uses sounds to give a dismissive tone
          • "Ay, ay,"
          • "Pshaw"
      • Non-fluency features
        • Sir Wilfull frequently pauses when he recognises his brother, which shows his indecisive-ness
      • Colloquialism
        • Witwoud uses these to undermine Sir W's status
          • "Wilfull of Salop"
      • Oaths and swearing
        • Sir W frequently uses these to show his lack of sophistication
          • "'Sbud"
          • "'Sheart"
    • Contextual Factors
      • As Sir W lives in the country and is more isolated from Restoration fashion, he may retain more Puritan-influenced values
    • Linguistic/ Grammatical Devices
      • Sentence functions
        • Witwoud uses an imperative to order Petulant to talk to his brother so Witwoud won't have to
          • "Petulant, speak."
        • Sir Wilfull's  interrogative shows his uncertainty. Is also more indirect, so polite
          • "No offence, I hope?"
      • Pronouns
        • Witwoud uses the personal pronoun "me" emphasise it and play his apprenticesh-ip to a felt-maker as a joke
          • "this fellow would have bound me to a maker of felts"
    • Literary Devices
      • Metaphor
        • Sir W uses a countryside or nature themed metaphor, possibly to show how he is out of place in the city
          • "This fellow knows less than a starling"
      • Sound Patterning
        • Sir W uses plosives, which imitate spitting, to show his disgust at Witwoud's foppishness
          • "thou art so becravated and so beperriwigg-ed"
        • Sir W uses fricatives to place emphasis on (what he perceives as) insults
          • "The fashion's a fool and you're a fop, dear brother
    • Rhetorical Devices
      • Repetition
        • Witwoud and Petulant repeat Sir W's common phrases as a way of mocking him
          • Witwoud: "No offence? Ha ha ha."
          • Petulant: No offence, I hope, sir?
          • Witwoud: "Your servant, brother"
        • Witwoud repeats negative terms to emphasise disdain for country manners. Gives  utterance  indignant tone
          • "'Tis not the fashion here, brother, indeed 'tis not."
      • Triple structures
        • Witwoud's use of a triple structure shows his excitement, nervousness and immaturity
          • "Smoke the boots, the boots, Petulant, the boots"
      • Incrementum
        • Sir W uses incrementum to undermine Witwoud and remind him of his lower status
          • "Your friends and your relations, your elders, your betters?"
    • How Dialogue Reveals Play's Form/Genre
      • Deflation
        • Witwoud is deflated when faced with his brother, who shows how ridiculous he is
    • Play's Themes
      • Love
        • Sir W wants the best for Witwoud and is angry that Witwoud is a fop, possibly because he is wasting his talents
      • Materialism
        • Witwoud demonstrates the materialism of the Londoners when contrasted with Sir W the country bumpkin
      • The Way of the World
        • Contrast between city and country
        • Country people see the city's fashions as ridiculous

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar English Language & Literature resources:

See all English Language & Literature resources »See all The Way of the World resources »