Rosenman et al. (1976)

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  • Created by: greggs25
  • Created on: 12-02-15 15:00
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  • Rosenman et al. (1976)
    • the aim of the study was to identify Type A behaviour was more likely to develop coronary heart disease.
      • they did a TAB assessment , in which  they did a structured interview. the participants had  to answer some questions  and the interviewer  recorded  behavioural signs of the type A pattern . E.g  restlessness, excessive tapping and the pace  at which they spoke.
      • the participants were  followed  up for 8.5 years. during  that time there were 257 heart attacks, 69% of which were in type A group. this was a significant effect even when lifestyle risk factors such as obesity and smoking were controlled for.
        • 3,454 middle-aged men on the west coast  of the US
    • Rosenman et al  concluded that high  TAB individual was more vulnerable to heart disease
  • Hardiness
    • Rosenman et al. (1976)
      • the aim of the study was to identify Type A behaviour was more likely to develop coronary heart disease.
        • they did a TAB assessment , in which  they did a structured interview. the participants had  to answer some questions  and the interviewer  recorded  behavioural signs of the type A pattern . E.g  restlessness, excessive tapping and the pace  at which they spoke.
        • the participants were  followed  up for 8.5 years. during  that time there were 257 heart attacks, 69% of which were in type A group. this was a significant effect even when lifestyle risk factors such as obesity and smoking were controlled for.
          • 3,454 middle-aged men on the west coast  of the US
      • Rosenman et al  concluded that high  TAB individual was more vulnerable to heart disease
    • there are some obvious connections between the work on TAB and Kobassa's concept of hardiness. according to Kobassa, high levels of control, commitment and challenge protect us against the harmful effects of stress. Research into TAB suggests that Type A people are less vulnerable to the effects of stress than was originally thought.
  • Ethnocentric and androcentric samples were used.

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