Romeo

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  • Romeo
    • Personality
      • Romeo is Romantic and Passionate
        • He talks a lot about love
        • He Rushes into whatever his feelings tell him to do which makes him seem passionate and easily overcome and controlled by his emotions
        • He meets Juliet and falls in love instantly - they get married within 24 hours
      • At first he is in love with Rosaline
        • At the start of the play he is lovesick beacause of his affection for Rosaline, who does not love him back
        • Romeo's love for Rosaline seems childish and unrealistic
        • Mercutio mocks Romeo for his cliche love poetry - this adds to the shallowness of Romeo's love for Rosaline
        • Juliet says "you kiss by th'book" to Romeo - This suggests his kissing is good but he doesn't put much of his feelings into it
        • Romeo uses a lot of metaphors to describe his love in the early stages of the play - Shakespeare does this to show Romeo's Immaturity - he knows more about poetic language than the actual emotion
      • He can be funny and intelligent
        • Romeo makes jokes and sexual puns with Mercutio which shows that he has a lighter side too
        • Shakespeare effectively uses Romeo's dialogue with Mercutio to highlight both his sense of humour
          • In doing so he conveys the strength of their relationship - the fact that Mercutio is brutally honest with Romeo also reminds the audience that Romeo is too obsessed with love
      • He's got a dangerous side too
        • Romeo is prepared to fight Tybalt to avenge Mercutio's death - this shows both his loyalty and violent side
        • There is a big contrast between Romeo's actions when he is with Juliet and when he is fighting - this shows he has a passionate and aggressive side
      • He loses his head a lot and makes lots of rash decisions
        • He never seems to think things through. Throughout the play he rushes into things such as secret marriages and duels
        • He comes across as headstrong when he ignores other people's advice to take things slowly, particularly the Friar
    • Themes
      • Romeo believes he is controlled by some greater force such as fate
      • Love - Romeo uses negative language when talking about Rosaline, whereas Juliet makes him happy so he uses images of brightness
        • Shakespeare uses the character of Romeo to reinforce the difference between love and infatuation
      • Shakespeare engages the audience by making them feel pity for Romeo as one of the main protagonists who is a victim of fate - as described in the prologue
      • Conflict - Romeo never fights without a reason, by contrast to the aggressive nature of characters such as Tybalt
        • However when he does fight - out of revenge for Mercutio or grief for Juliet - his violence is wild and unstoppable
      • Fate - Romeo worries that he can feel "Some consequence yet hanging in the stars" and worries that fate is against him. Whilst this darkens the theme of the play it also highlights the fact that he will not accept responsibility for his own decisions
    • Quotes
      • "O, I am fortune's fool!" Act 3 Scene 1
        • Reveals that Romeo only sees reason too late
        • Fortune = irony as the word misfortune would be more apt
        • Romeo believes he is controlled by some greater force such as fate
      • "Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire, sick health" Act 1 Scene 1
        • The Oxymorons emphasise that Romeo is overcome and confused by his emotions
        • Love - Romeo uses negative language when talking about Rosaline, whereas Juliet makes him happy so he uses images of brightness
          • Shakespeare uses the character of Romeo to reinforce the difference between love and infatuation
      • "Immortal Blessing" Act 3 Scene 3
        • Suicide is considered a sin in the eyes of humanity - Romeo would go to hell
        • Dramatic Irony - Both characters end up dead

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