The role of caregiver-infant interactions in developing attachments

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  • Created by: Danni
  • Created on: 02-12-12 16:33
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  • Role of caregiver-infant interactions in developing attachments
    • Interactional synchrony
      • Isabella et al (1989) - securely-attached mother-infant pairs = more instances interactional synchrony
      • Frame-by-frame analysis of film recordings = matched to sound recordings of adult conversation - babies move in time with rhythm of conversation + demonstrate subtle form of turn-taking
      • Condon + Sander (1974)  - babies coordinate actions with adult speech + take turns to contribute to adult conversation
      • Levine et al (1994) - interactional synchrony = not demonstrated in all cultures: Kenyan mothers rarely cuddle + interact even though attentive + respond to needs
    • Immediate physical interaction
      • 1970s research
      • Skin-to-skin contact = important for formation of a bond
      • Bee (1989) - long-term effects = less reliably demonstrated,but some cases: early contact = related to general adequacy of parenting
      • Klaus + Kennel (1976) - mothers who cuddle baby during critical period = better relationships
      • In short-term, mothers experience more tender relationships + look at baby more if experienced immediate physical contact
      • Myers (1980) - immediate physical contact = neither necessary nor sufficient for development of attachment
    • Imitation
      • Capacity to imitate facial expressions - children = innately social beings + take active part in relationship formation in 1st months of life
      • Meltzoff + Moore (1977) -  presented babies 3 facial expressions, independent judges rate for likeness, significant likeness - infants = able to imitate
      • Jacobsen (1959) - babies = not intentionally social - respond same to inanimate objects
    • Motherese
      • Drawing child into communication perhaps helps to establish relationship
      • Differs from normal linguistic style: slow, high-pitched + repetitive
      • Snow + Ferguson (1977) - adults = distinctive language patterns when talking to children
  • Motherese
    • Drawing child into communication perhaps helps to establish relationship
    • Differs from normal linguistic style: slow, high-pitched + repetitive
    • Snow + Ferguson (1977) - adults = distinctive language patterns when talking to children
  • Adults use motherese with all babies

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