Public Health in the nineteenth century

  • Created by: dr34080
  • Created on: 02-01-19 17:01
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  • Edwin Chadwick
    • In charge of enquiry into living conditions after two cholera outbreaks in 1837 and 1838
    • Public Health in the 19th century
      • Dr John Snow
        • During another cholera outbreak in 1854 he noted that all the victims lived near the same water pump in Broad Street, Soho, London.
          • He removed the handle so everyone had to use another water pump.
            • The outbreak stopped.
        • Later found that a street toilet was leaking into the pump's water source
          • Snow suspected cholera was not airborne (miasma), but contagious and caught by contact with infected water.
        • The Great Stink
          • Despite Snow's findings, public health didn't improve
          • In the summer of 1858 a heat wave caused the River Thames to produce the 'Great Stink'
          • This alarmed politicians so much that with the combined new evidence about cholera, they agreed to pay for sanitary improvements
          • Parliament gave Joseph Bazalgette enough money to build a new sewage system
      • The Great Stink
        • Despite Snow's findings, public health didn't improve
        • In the summer of 1858 a heat wave caused the River Thames to produce the 'Great Stink'
        • This alarmed politicians so much that with the combined new evidence about cholera, they agreed to pay for sanitary improvements
        • Parliament gave Joseph Bazalgette enough money to build a new sewage system
    • Government did not act on this, they believed in 'laissez-faire' ideas
    • Need laws to be passed to improve drainage and sewers
    • Need clean water for clean habits
    • Medical officers should be appointed to take charge in each district
    • Disease is caused by bad air, damp, filth and overcrowded houses
  • Government action
    • Another cholera epidemic in 1848
      • Passed the 1848 Public Health Act
        • Not compulsory
        • Some towns made huge improvements, others chose to do nothing
    • 1875 Public Health Act
      • Made compulsory
      • Medical Officers were appointed
      • Councils ordered to build sewers, supply fresh water and collect the rubbish
      • Public Health in the 19th century
        • Dr John Snow
          • During another cholera outbreak in 1854 he noted that all the victims lived near the same water pump in Broad Street, Soho, London.
            • He removed the handle so everyone had to use another water pump.
              • The outbreak stopped.
          • Later found that a street toilet was leaking into the pump's water source
            • Snow suspected cholera was not airborne (miasma), but contagious and caught by contact with infected water.
    • Edwin Chadwick
      • In charge of enquiry into living conditions after two cholera outbreaks in 1837 and 1838
      • Government did not act on this, they believed in 'laissez-faire' ideas
      • Need laws to be passed to improve drainage and sewers
      • Need clean water for clean habits
      • Medical officers should be appointed to take charge in each district
      • Disease is caused by bad air, damp, filth and overcrowded houses

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