Psychological Explanations For Obesity

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  • Psychological Explanations For Obesity
    • Restraint Theory
      • Restrained eating is counterproductive
        • End up gaining more weight due to disinhibition
      • Cognitive Control
        • Consciously think about their weight and eating
        • Categorise food into 'good' and 'bad'
      • Restrained eater becomes more occupied with food than they were before
        • Ignore important physiological indicators - no longer eat when hungry and stop when full
    • Disinhibition
      • A period of restrained eating is often followed by disinhibited eating
      • Restraiined eaters vulnerable to disinhibited eating due to food related cues
        • Internal disinhibitors - mood
        • External disinhibitors - media
      • Cognitive
        • Distorted thinking
          • Disinhibition caused by stress and food cues
          • Thoughts stay with them until the end of the binge
          • All-Or-Nothing thinking
            • continues to eat because there's no point stopping once you've started
    • Boundary Model
      • Biological Processes
        • Food intake exists on a continuum from hungry to satiated
        • When energy levels dip below a 'set point' we feel an aversion of hunger and feel motivated to eat
        • When we are full we are uncomfortable and are motivated to stop eating
      • Psychological Processes
        • Zone of biological indifference
          • Area between hunger and satiated boundaries
          • Biological processes have little effect on eating during this zone
            • Food related beliefs and rituals, social norms and irrational beliefs have control
          • People who restrict their food intae have
            • Lower hunger boundaries - they are less responsive to feelings of hunger
            • Higher satiety boundaries - they need more food to feel full

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