progressive education theme 2

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  • Progressive Education
    • during the 60s and 70s, new ands unconventional methods of teaching were being pioneered.
    • 'rote learning' was being replaced by 'child centred leaning' = partly due to the Plowden Report.
      • Plowden Report recommended: banning corporal punishment/ giving children more freedom within the classroom/ encouraging teachers to help and advise, rather than lecture pupils.
    • a small % of teachers saw progressive education as a means to introduce overly political ideas into the classroom.
    • the Black Papers: Brian Cox and Tony Dyson published the Papers, criticising the decline in teacher's authority in the classroom - yet neither of the men advocated for the return of the strict and harsh discipline  previously.
    • Ruskin Speech suggested that: progressive education had some merits and achieved good results when in the hands of skilled teachers, but failed when it was applied incorrectly/ Callaghan did not wish to return to the rote learning of the 1950s/ teachers should be more closely scrutinised and inspected.
    • Yellow Book stated that: school discipline had declined/ many school curricula did not prepare pupils to take up productive roles in the economy/ the govt. and the public had too little say over what went on in schools.
    • Willian Tyndale School: attained national notoriety as the school removed all rules and allowed pupils to decide what they wanted to do, including watching TV or leaving the classroom.
      • Parents withdrew their children as a result/ protest and an official govt. enquiry was held about the failings of the school, which concluded that the teachers had placed their own revolutionary, socialist views ahead of their commitment of teaching pupils.
    • Academics that supported progressive education believed that if schools were friendlier, less strict and more welcoming, then educational attainment would improve, especially in deprived areas where children were disadvantaged by poverty.
  • Willian Tyndale School: attained national notoriety as the school removed all rules and allowed pupils to decide what they wanted to do, including watching TV or leaving the classroom.
    • Parents withdrew their children as a result/ protest and an official govt. enquiry was held about the failings of the school, which concluded that the teachers had placed their own revolutionary, socialist views ahead of their commitment of teaching pupils.

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