Evolution of Products (History of Product Design)

HideShow resource information
View mindmap
  • Evolution of Products (History of Product Design)
    • Design Movements
      • Product Design movements have always been influenced by...
        • the discovery of new materials
        • Iconic Products
        • Developments in...
          • Manufacturing
          • Technological
        • Fashions, trends and latest thinking.
    • Influences of Nature
      • Arts and Crafts (1890s)
        • Founded By William Morris
        • Promoted quality craftsmanship
        • Inspired by natural patterns and forms
        • Used high-quality materials, which were only affordable by the wealthy
      • Art Nouveau 1890-1914
        • Developed in europe
        • Based on natural, organic lines
        • Included designers like Charles Rennie Mackintosh and Louis Comfort Tiffany
    • Influences of Industry
      • Modernist
        • Influenced by industrial designs and made use of geometric shapes
      • Bauhaus 1919-1933
        • Produced first design for mass production
        • Origin of many "Design Classics"
      • Art Deco 1920s-1930s
        • Began with an exhibition of products in Paris 1925
        • Involved the use of geometric shapes
        • Influenced by artefacts in Tutankhamens's recently opened tomb
        • Included ceramicist Claris Cliff
        • Regarded as  a "glamorous" period
      • De Stijl mid-1920s
        • Featured extreme geometric design, e.g rectangles and primary colours
        • Inspired completely new designs in furniture and architecture
        • Included the painter, Piet Mondrian, and designer Gerrit Rietveld (Red and Blue design classic)
    • War, Post-war and the 1960s
      • Streamlined Age
        • Was about speed and movement
        • New materials and production methods allowed designs to be manufactured  cheaply.
        • Three main Influences
          • Rapid Growth in transport design
          • Interest in science
          • Race to put the first man on the moon
      • 1960s
        • Huge consumer growth as consumers craved new ideas
        • "Mods" represented the first separate teenage consumer market.
        • Designers included Mary Quant (designer of the mini skirt) and Alec Issigonis (Morris Mini)
    • 1970-Present Day
      • By the 1980s the designer name or brand was important to consumers
        • Designer label spread from fashion markets to other areas of product design.
        • Promotion and packaging became a key part of the complete product.
      • Memphis Group Early 1980s
        • Alternative viewpoint to minimalism
        • Started  by a group of Italian designers, led by Ettore Sottsass.
        • Produced highly-decorative laminates and humorous product.
        • Post-modernism influence can be seen in many of today's products
      • Blobism
        • current trend characterised by a lack of straight lines and produced in a variety of ways. The development of sophisticated CAD software has allowed complex flowing forms to be designed and manufactured.
    • Design icons
      • Some products are so innovative and influential that they are regarded as classic designs or design icons
      • A design  could be considered to be iconic because...
        • of the way that technology has been used
        • it uses clever and innovative styling
        • it simply has a "must own" quality
      • Coca - Cola Bottle
        • Globally recognized object because..
          • Distinctive shape
          • Brand Name
      • Biro
        • Main product of BIC
        • The  word Biro is used today to describe all ballpoint pens
      • Volkswagen Beetle
        • Given its name due to its unusual shape.
    • Retro Styling
      • Retro styling has become very popular.
        • Retro  designs aren't old-fashioned products. They are based on old styles, but made to the latest stands using the latest technologies.
          • For example, some modern radios are modelled on Lawrence Griffin's 1950s design.
      • Retro design is commonly seen...
        • Where there is a strong surface decoration, e.g, wallpaper, fabrics and ceramics.
        • Electrical appliances, e.g DeLonghi toaster
        • Fashion, e.g. in 1965 Yves St Laurent designed a dress based on Piet Mondrian's work about 40 years earlier
        • transport design, e.g. Chrysler PT Cruiser
    • New Products
      • Market Pull
        • The market place creates consumer demand. Consumers see a product that they want to buy. This creates a demand for the product and can often lead to development and expansion of that product
      • Technological Push
        • A Push/Pull effect creates demands that are met by the development of products
          • Market Pull
            • The market place creates consumer demand. Consumers see a product that they want to buy. This creates a demand for the product and can often lead to development and expansion of that product
        • Some new products are developed due to the technological advance of...
          • New Materials
          • Production Methods
          • Scientists develop a new material, and an imaginative designer then thinks of a use for the material in a commercial application
    • Quality Control Guidelines
      • Products can  evolve as manufacturers aim to constantly improve their products. This is part of Total Quality Management (TQM)
        • Companies are continually assessed, so they need to spend time looking at..
          • the way they work
          • how they can improve their products or manufacturing methods.
        • There are standard controls that help to make sure that everything is done in an orderly and controlled way:
          • Every part of  a product is specified and documented
          • There are set procedures to follow if anyone thinks there is a problem with a product
          • Changes need to be authorised by a senior person
        • The manufacturing specification is continually updated and agreed with the client. manufacturers create quality circles - groups of workers who feedback information to ensure the quality of the product is continually improving.
          • Continuous Improvement
            • Legislation/Regulation
            • Environmental Feedback
            • Consumer Feedback
            • Styling updates
            • maintenance issues
            • new Technologies
            • Improved Durability
            • Manufacturing Improvements
            • Financial Savings
    • Why products Evolve. Products also develop over time due to..
      • developments in new materials, e.g. smart materials
      • changes in manufacturing methods, e.g. automated production processes
      • new technologies,e.g. micro-electronics
      • social changes, e.g. women going out to work
      • changing fashions, e.g. seasonal colours in textile products.
      • One example of a product which has evolved is the iron, it has evolved dramatically since the 1900s

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Design Technology: Product Design resources:

See all Design Technology: Product Design resources »See all resources »