British Educational Research Journal simplification breakdown

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  • Problem Children B.E.R.J
    • Societal perceptions of 'normal behaviour'
      • Offensive behaviour (traumatic) e.g. punching, biting, kicking etc.
        • Offensive behaviour (non-traumatic) e.g. ignoring instructions
      • Offensive behaviour (non-traumatic) e.g. ignoring instructions
    • Reputation as a 'problem' in schools
      • Teacher's instructions are the 'norm' at a formative age, and if you go against their advice you're a 'problem', even if you're argument is logical
        • Listening to teacher instructions grants you the 'pass' of a 'good-child'
          • R.forcement theory
    • Poor impulse control, behaviour and concentration
      • Offensive behaviour (traumatic) e.g. punching, biting, kicking etc.
      • Children are simple creatures with simple minds
        • Complex instruction = confusion
          • Complex teacher behaviour = confusion
            • Children at a young age mimic authority figures, and if the authority figures behaviour is confusing the child will mimic the exact behaviour, which if it is 'bad behaviour' = child being punished
        • Teachers label parents as the problem for their child's behaviour
          • Children are then labelled as 'feral' and 'rule-breakers' due to a 'lack' of 'discipline'. As such they are 'unfit' to 'cope' with the 'demands' of school
          • Teachers take the 'moral high ground' and think they are the one's who 'understand' the child
            • Children are then labelled as 'feral' and 'rule-breakers' due to a 'lack' of 'discipline'. As such they are 'unfit' to 'cope' with the 'demands' of school
          • Parents are subject to scrutiny for their child's behaviour if the child is 'problematic'
      • Discursive 'framing' of the 'problem' behaviour
        • Children are simple creatures with simple minds
          • Complex instruction = confusion
            • Complex teacher behaviour = confusion
              • Children at a young age mimic authority figures, and if the authority figures behaviour is confusing the child will mimic the exact behaviour, which if it is 'bad behaviour' = child being punished
          • Teachers label parents as the problem for their child's behaviour
            • Teachers take the 'moral high ground' and think they are the one's who 'understand' the child
              • Parents are subject to scrutiny for their child's behaviour if the child is 'problematic'
          • Medicalisation of the problem e.g. Autism, ADD, ADHD
            • This leads onto different attitudes towards the child's development,as the problems the child is encountering is not their own, and beyond their control
              • The attitudes that come about are 'relaxed' and 'less-intensive' on the child = 'flexibility' in the treatment of the child. But in the public eye they're marked as 'different'
          • Pre-existing attitudes and labels amongst teachers in primary education can arise if the child has a 'reputation' from either their previous school or nursery
            • 'Reputation' for 'bad-behaviour' = decreased chance to be 'good' or get recognition for 'good' behaviour

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