Polymerisation - C2 mindmap

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  • Polymerisation
    • Polymerisation means loads of small molecules link together.
      • Plastics are formed when lots of small molecules, called monomers, join together to make a very long molecule called a polymer.
      • They are usually carbon based.
      • Under high pressure many small molecules "join hands" (polymerise) to form long chains called polymers.
    • There are lots of different types of polymers.
      • Polymerisation reactions involving different monomers can be used to make a wide range of polymers.
        • Different polymers have different physical properties- some are stronger, some are stretchier, some are more easily moulded.
      • Strong, rigid polymers such as high-density polyethene are used to make plastic milk bottles.
      • PVC is strong and durable, so it can be made either rigid or stretchy. The rigid kind is used to make window frames and piping. The stretchy kind is used to make synthetic leather.
    • Polymers have replaced natural materials for some uses.
      • Rigid PVC has largely replaced wood as a material for new window frames. It's weather-resistant, strong and durable, which makes windows more secure and means the frames don't need painting every few years (as wooden frames do). PVC window frames often don't look as good as wooden ones though.
  • Polymerisation means loads of small molecules link together.
    • Plastics are formed when lots of small molecules, called monomers, join together to make a very long molecule called a polymer.
    • They are usually carbon based.
    • Under high pressure many small molecules "join hands" (polymerise) to form long chains called polymers.
  • Light, stretchable polymers such as low-density polyethene are used for plastic bags and squeezy bottles. Low-density polyethene has a low melting point, so it's no good for anything that'll get very hot.
    • There are lots of different types of polymers.
      • Polymerisation reactions involving different monomers can be used to make a wide range of polymers.
        • Different polymers have different physical properties- some are stronger, some are stretchier, some are more easily moulded.
      • Strong, rigid polymers such as high-density polyethene are used to make plastic milk bottles.
      • PVC is strong and durable, so it can be made either rigid or stretchy. The rigid kind is used to make window frames and piping. The stretchy kind is used to make synthetic leather.
  • Synthetic fibres like nylon and polyester are often used to replace cotton, wool or silk fabrics. Compared with natural alternatives these synthetic fabrics tend to be lighter, more durable, water-resistant and often cheaper. The main disadvantage of many synthetic fabrics is that they aren't breathable, which can make them uncomfortable next to the skin.
    • Polymers have replaced natural materials for some uses.
      • Rigid PVC has largely replaced wood as a material for new window frames. It's weather-resistant, strong and durable, which makes windows more secure and means the frames don't need painting every few years (as wooden frames do). PVC window frames often don't look as good as wooden ones though.

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