Child Language Acquisition (Speech)

Mindmap of points to analyse for speech/reading transcripts by framework

HideShow resource information
View mindmap
  • Points to analyse for speech/reading
    • Grammar
      • Ellision
      • Syntactic structure
      • Tense
        • Past
        • Present
        • Future
      • Negatives
        • Correct use needs syntactic awareness.
        • Ursula Bellugi, three stages of negative formation.
          • Stage one: 'no' or 'not' at beginning of sentence e.g. no wear shoes
          • Stage two: moves 'no/not' inside sentence e.g. I no want it
          • Stage three: attaches negative to auxiliary verb and copla verb 'be' securely e.g. no. I don't want to go to nursery
      • Sentence types
        • Interrogatives
        • Declaratives
        • Exclamatories
        • Imperatives
      • Pronouns
        • Ursula Bellugi, three stages (telegraphic stage)
          • Stage one: Child uses own name e.g. 'Tony plays'
          • Stage two: i/me pronouns are used in different places within a sentence
          • Stage three:child uses i/me according to whether they are subject or object
      • Determiners (acquired later in development, between telegraphic and post-telegraphic stages)
        • Numerals e.g. one, two
        • Articles e.g. a, the
        • Possessives e.g. my
        • Quantifiers e.g. some, many
        • Demonstratives e.g. this
      • Modifiers
        • Intensifiers e.g. very
        • Inflectional Morphology (to create tense, possessions or plurals)
        • Deviational morphology (adding preffixes and suffixes to convert word classes)
      • Virtuous Error
        • Logical choices made by children that are grammatically wrong
          • e.g. 'I runned vs I ran'
            • Jean Berko, Wug test
    • Lexis/Semantics
      • Holophrases
        • A single word expressing a whole idea
          • E.g. 'Drink' for 'I want a drink'
      • Proto-words
        • An invented word with a consistent meaning
          • The child builds on this to communicate with a wider range of people besides caregiver
      • First 50 words (Katherine Nelson)
        • Naming (things/people)
        • Actions/events
        • Describing/ modifying things
        • Personal/ social work
      • Vocative Nouns
        • a form (usually of a noun) used to address a person
          • These can be diminutive
            • E.g. Mummy
      • Semantic fields
        • Particularly occurs in imaginative play
          • Are there any stereotypes present?
      • Over Extension
        • Categorical
          • The name for one member of a category is extended to all members in category
            • e.g. 'Apple' for all round fruit
        • Analogical
          • One word is extended into other categories (based on physical or functional connection)
            • e.g. Ball for round fruit
        • Mis-match statements
          • One word statements that appear quite abstract
            • e.g. 'Duck' when looking at an empty pond
      • Under Extension
        • A word's meaning is reduced from its full range of meanings
          • e.g. 'Fruit' for only apples
      • Jean Aitchison's stages of linguistic development
        • 1) Labelling
          • Linking words to their referrers
        • 2) Packaging
          • Exploring labels and what they can apply to
        • 3) Network building
          • Making connections, understanding opposites and similarities
    • Phonology
      • Deletion
        • Omittting the final consonant
          • e.g. do(g)
      • Substitution
        • One sound is substituted for another
          • e.g. 'pip'for 'ship'
      • Addition
        • Adding an extra vowel
          • E.g. doggie
      • Assimilation
        • Changing a consonant or vowel for another
          • Early plosives can be exchanged
            • e.g. 'd/b', 'gog' for 'dog'
      • Reduplication
        • Repeating a whole syllable
          • e.g. mama or dada
      • Deletion of unstressed syllables
        • e.g nana for banana
      • Jean Berko, 'Fis' Phenomenon
        • Said that children recognise more syllables than they can pronounce
      • Consonant Cluster Reductions
        • Can be difficult to articulate, so are reduced for smaller units
          • e.g. 'pider' for 'spider'
      • Types of sound
        • Fricatives
          • Voiced: b,g, d
          • Unvoiced: p,h, k
        • Plosives
          • Voiced: v, z
          • Unvoiced: f,s
        • Affricatives
          • Voiced: dz
          • Unvoiced: tf
        • Nasals
          • Voiced: m,n,
        • Laterals
          • Voiced: l
        • Approximants
          • Voiced: w,r,j
    • Pragmatics
      • Michael Halliday's Functions of Speech
        • Instrumental
          • Used to fulfill a need
        • Regulatory
          • Influences the behaviour of others
        • Interactional
          • Develop & maintain social relationships
        • Personal
          • To convey opinion
        • Representational
          • Conveys facts and information
        • Imaginative
          • To create an imaginary world
        • Heuristic
          • To learn about the environment
      • Dore's language functions
        • Labelling
          • Naming a person, object or thing
        • Answering
          • Responding to utterance another  speaker
        • Calling
          • Greeting someone or something
        • Protesting
          • Objecting to requests from others
        • Repeating
          • Repeating an adult word or utterance
        • Requesting action
          • Asking for something to be done
        • Greeting
          • Greeting someone or something
        • Practising
          • Using language when no adult is present
        • poop
      • Egocentric Speech
        • Speech used when the child is alone to classify experience of environment
          • Coined by Piaget
      • Politeness
        • Positive Politeness
          • Social inclusion and approval
        • Negative Politeness
          • When a speaker needs to be independant
        • Face-saving phrases can be used to make the receiver feel good
      • Halliday and Dore draw on Piaget's ideas

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar English Language resources:

See all English Language resources »See all Child language acquisition resources »