Different Plates

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  • Plate boundary's
    • The point where two plates meet is known as a plate boundary.
      • There are different types of plate boundary
        • Conservative plate boundary
          • This is where two plates move parallel to each other, in the same direction.
            • The landscape has a crumpled appearance
              • Volcanoes are not found at these plate boundary's - no land is created or destroyed at these boundary's
            • The pressure eventually builds up
              • is eventually released by an earthquake
    • An example - North american and pacific plate
      • Conservative plate boundary
        • This is where two plates move parallel to each other, in the same direction.
          • The landscape has a crumpled appearance
            • Volcanoes are not found at these plate boundary's - no land is created or destroyed at these boundary's
          • The pressure eventually builds up
            • is eventually released by an earthquake
      • Constructive plate boundary's
        • This is when the plates pull away from each other
          • Due to convection currents in the mantle
          • magma rises and solidifies to form igneous rock
            • Volcanoes and mid ocean trenches are formed here
        • North America and Eurasian plate
          • Collision plate boundary
            • When  two continental plates move towards each other
    • Destructive plate boundary
      • This is where a denser oceanic plate moves towards a less dense continental plate
        • The oceanic plate is forced under the continental plate, in a process called subduction
          • Subduction zone
            • The oceanic plate may bring sea water down with it - this then produces steam and explosive magma
              • The magma then rises through the continental crust - composite volcanoes are then formed
  • The oceanic plate may bring sea water down with it - this then produces steam and explosive magma
    • The magma then rises through the continental crust - composite volcanoes are then formed

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