Othello - Act 1

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  • Created by: Nathalieb
  • Created on: 01-06-18 13:35
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  • Othello - Act 1
    • Scene 2
      • Othello
        • ‘Tis better as it is
        • My parts, my title and my perfect soul Shall manifest me rightly
        • Keep up your bright swords, for the dew will rust them
      • Cassio
        • Your haste-post-haste appearance Even on the instant
      • Brabantio
        • Down with him, thief!
        • O thou foul thief
        • Sooty bosom
        • Thou hast practised on her with foul charms, Abused her delicate youth with drugs
        • For if such actions may have passage free, bond-slaves and pagans shall our statesmen be
    • Scene  1
      • Iago
        • I know my price: I am worth no worse a place
        • Michael Cassio, a Florentine, A fellow almost damned in a fair wife
        • Mere prattle without practice/ Is all his soldiership
        • I follow him to serve my turn upon him
        • Were I the Moor, I would not be Iago/ In following him, I follow but myself
        • Thick-lips
        • though he in a fertile climate dwell,/ Plague him with flies
        • Thieves, thieves, thieves!
        • An old black ram/ Is tupping your white ewe!
        • Arise, arise;
        • Your/ daughter covered with a Barbary house; you’ll have/ your nephews neigh to you; you’ll have coursers for cousins, and jennets for germans.
        • Making the beast with two backs
      • Brabantio
        • My house is not a grange
        • Fathers, from hence trust not your daughters’ mind
      • Roderigo
        • By heaven, I rather would have been his hangman
        • To the gross clasps of a lascivious Moor
        • Tying her duty, beauty, wit and fortunes In an extravagant and wheeling stranger Of here and everywhere
    • Scene 3
      • Othello
        • “D: (To Othello) What in your own part can you say to this?B: Nothing, but this is soO: Most potent, grave, and reverend seigniors, My very noble and approved good masters”
        • Rude am I in my speech, And little blest with the soft phase of peace
        • Little of this great world can I speak
        • I won his daughter
        • Send for the lady
        • Her father loved me, oft invited me; Still questioned me the story of my life
        • Of moving accidents by flood and field, Of hair-breadth scapes… Of being taken by the insolent foe
        • with a greedy ear Devour up my discourse
        • She gave me for my pains a world of sighs
        • If I had a friend that loved her, I should but teach him
        • She loved me for the dangers I had passed, And I loved her that she did pity them
        • Beg it not Of please the palate of my appetite
        • My life upon her faith
      • Desdemona
        • divided duty
        • duty as my mother showed To you, preferring you before her father
        • I may profess Due to the Moor my love
        • I saw Othello’s visage in his mind, And to his honours and his valiant parts Did I my soul and fortunes consecrate
      • Iago
        • Ere I would say I would drown myself for the love of a guinea-hen, I would change my humanity with a baboon
        • Drown thyself? Drown cats and blind puppies
        • Put money in thy purse
        • The food that to him now is as luscious as locusts, shall be to him shortly as bitter as coloquintida
        • She must change for youth: when she is sated with his body, she will find the error of her choice
        • If sanctimony and a frail vow betwixt an erring barbarian and a supersubtle Venetian be not too hard for my wits and all the tribe of hell, thou shalt enjoy her: therefore make money
        • ‘twixt’ my sheets He’s done my office
        • Mere suspicion in that kind, Will do as if for surety
        • How? How? Let’s see: After some time, to abuse Othello’s ears That he is too familiar with his wife
        • The Moor is of a free and open nature
        • be led by th’nose As asses are
        • Hell and night Must bring this monstrous birth to the world’s light
      • Brabantio
        • so flood-gate and o’erbearing nature That it engluts and swallows other sorrows
        • “B: My daughter! O my daughter!D: Dead?B: Ay, to me: She is abused, stol’n from me, and corrupted By spells and medicines”
        • A maiden never bold; Of spirit so still and quiet
        • Look to her, Moor, if though hast eyes to see: She has deceived her father, and may thee
      • Duke
        • Valiant Othello
        • To vouch this is no proof, Without more wider and more overt test
        • I think this tale would win my daughter too
        • The Turk with as most mighty preparation makes for Cyprus (No rhymes)
        • If virtue no delighted beauty lack, your son-in-law is far more fair than black
      • Roderigo
        • I will incontinently drown myself
        • It is silliness to live, when to live is torment

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