On her blindness

  • Created by: olivert5
  • Created on: 18-02-19 17:47
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  • On her blindness, Adam Thorpe
    • Title of the poem
      • A reference to On his blindness by John Milton
      • The change to 'her' is significant as there must be a personal reason for it
      • 'Her' means it is third person, so some readers will find it more emotional.
    • Form
      • Two lines per stanza is unusual and is hard to read at a normal pace
      • The isolated final stanza makes the death more poignant and dramatic
      • A lack of punctuation intensifies the sense of conversation and alludes to the sense of a stream of consciousness
      • The sense of intimacy and conversation means that the poem seems more personal
      • The lines are relatively consistent lengths - the shorter 'long after it was safe' marks a turning point in the poem
      • Speech is included which makes the poem seem more personal - the different tones also enhance memorability.
    • Death is universal in everyone's life so it will illicit a strong reader response
    • Language analysis
      • bumping into walls like a dodgem
        • Dark humour and bathos are shown here
        • Infers an inevitability about her condition which is emotive
        • The humour can be seen as a kind of coping mechanism for the narrator and mother
      • Strong imagery eg. ablaze with colour
        • ablaze connotes glory and power
        • Makes us more empathetic with the mother's condition
      • Could not bear being blind
        • homophone with bare suggesting vulnerability
        • strong opening statement intensified by alliteration
      • Slow slide
        • drawn out sibilance emphasises the descent into blindness
        • shows the difficulty from her condition
      • She was watching, somewhere in the end
        • She had previously lost the ability to watch
        • Uncertain about where

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