Of Mice and Men

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  • Created by: Becky2121
  • Created on: 19-05-16 13:04
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  • Of Mice and Men - Themes
    • Isolation
      • Crooks
        • He's not allowed in the bunk house with the others - he has his own room which he shares with the horses. He doesn't get much time with the others.
          • Links to the idea of segregation and racism in the 1930's. Can be used in the context in Part B
            • Biterness briefly disappears when he talks to Lennie about the dream -
              • Lennie is always described as an animal but it varies as to which animal. Sometime he is a bear which shows how powerful Lennie and dangerous Lennie can be without realising his own strength but sometimes he is a sheep as from "bleating with terror" so shows how he nevr means to be dangerous and so shows the childlike side of him
              • Comes back again when George gets back and he realises how unrealisitic it is due to the attitudes of racism
                • Links to the idea of segregation and racism in the 1930's. Can be used in the context in Part B
                  • Biterness briefly disappears when he talks to Lennie about the dream -
                    • Lennie is always described as an animal but it varies as to which animal. Sometime he is a bear which shows how powerful Lennie and dangerous Lennie can be without realising his own strength but sometimes he is a sheep as from "bleating with terror" so shows how he nevr means to be dangerous and so shows the childlike side of him
                    • Comes back again when George gets back and he realises how unrealisitic it is due to the attitudes of racism
                      • "Well just forget it ... I didn't mean it. Jus' foolin'" - Page 96
                    • "Why'd I come an lend a hand" - Page 87
                  • The only person who doesn't have this attitude is Lennie - his mental disability makes him naive and unable to understand concepts like racism - when he goes to meet Crooks he doesn't care that he's black
                • "Well just forget it ... I didn't mean it. Jus' foolin'" - Page 96
              • "Why'd I come an lend a hand" - Page 87
            • The only person who doesn't have this attitude is Lennie - his mental disability makes him naive and unable to understand concepts like racism - when he goes to meet Crooks he doesn't care that he's black
          • "S'pose you couldn't go into the bunkhouse and play rummy" - Page __
          • Results in him becoming bitter towards other characters
          • Curley's Wife
            • Isolated due to being married to Curley
              • Nobody will speak to her properly because they're all afraid of what Curley will do to them
                • She's emotionally isolated as she only really gets viewed as "a tart" so all she wants is for somebody to have a proper conversation with
                  • Also because Curley never pays attention to her so she wants affection and to be appreciated
                  • The guys won't talk to her because she's dangerous due to being seen as sexual
                    • She's seen as a possession and a sexual object
                      • Links to the theme of "women and attitudes towards them"
                        • "Ain't I got a right to talk to nobody?" - Page 99
                          • She's seen as a possession and a sexual object
                            • Links to the theme of "women and attitudes towards them"
                              • "Ain't I got a right to talk to nobody?" - Page 99
              • Isolated as she is a women and so therefore does not get to take part in with the guys take part in - she is seen as less impportant
                • Links to the theme of "women and the attitudes towards them"
            • In a sense, all characters are isolated
              • Whether it's physically like Crooks or emotionally like Curley's Wife
            • George
              • Not physically isolated but emotionally isolated
                • He has to spend so much time looking after Lennie and making sure he doesn't get into trouble that he doesn't get to socialise with the bunkhouse men so doesn't get to make friendships
                  • You can slightly understand why George goes to the cat house and leaves Lennie behind
                    • He is basically a parent to Lennie and even parents need a night off so this is what George is doing - he's having a night off away from Lennie and getting the chance to not be responsible
                      • Links to the themes of "friendship" and responsibility
          • Dreams and Reality
            • THIS IS A KEY THEME IN THE NOVEL. FOCUS ON THIS IF POSSIBLE
            • Lennie
              • "Red and blue and green rabbits"
              • Shows the reality of how unrealistic this dream this is
                • "Red and blue and green rabbits"
                • It foreshadows of how this dream will never come true as you know this isn't possible and as the rabbits are such a key part of the dream it shows how the dream is practically just fantasy
            • Doesn't really believe it for most of the novel and so shows how he is aware of how unrealistic and unachievable it is.
              • It's more of a story he tells Lennie to keep him happy and provide him with comfort
                • Lennie comes first and George is always doing what is best for him
                  • Links to the idea of George is the parent and so is responsible for both of them
                    • To the themes of responsibility
              • He does believe it for a brief period of time before again remembering how unrealistic it is
                • "I bet we could swing her he repeated  softly"
                  • The repetition of the phrase and the adjective "softly" shows how he never believed it before but he has a moment of optimisim
              • George
                • Not physically isolated but emotionally isolated
                  • He has to spend so much time looking after Lennie and making sure he doesn't get into trouble that he doesn't get to socialise with the bunkhouse men so doesn't get to make friendships
                    • You can slightly understand why George goes to the cat house and leaves Lennie behind
                      • He is basically a parent to Lennie and even parents need a night off so this is what George is doing - he's having a night off away from Lennie and getting the chance to not be responsible
                        • Links to the themes of "friendship" and responsibility
              • "We could live offa the fatta the lan'" - Page 65
            • She had dream about being in movies - why she dresses in all red (she wants to be like the movie stars)
              • This never comes true which is what leads to have to marry Curly and live on the ranch - she never wants to but it's the second best option
                • It never came true as the man that said he would send her a letter never did
                  • She has her hopes built up by a man and then has a man let her down - shows how it's a male orientated world
                    • Can be linked to the idea themes of "Women and the attitudes towards them" and "isolation"
                      • Isolation as if her dream had of came true she never would've been on the ranch and therefore would've been happy
                      • Women as it shows how even a women's dream needs a man - everything  a women does basically revolves around a man due to them being seen as more important
                        • She has her hopes built up by a man and then has a man let her down - shows how it's a male orientated world
                          • Can be linked to the idea themes of "Women and the attitudes towards them" and "isolation"
                            • Isolation as if her dream had of came true she never would've been on the ranch and therefore would've been happy
                            • Women as it shows how even a women's dream needs a man - everything  a women does basically revolves around a man due to them being seen as more important

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