Norman Crime and Punishment

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  • NORMAN CRIME AND PUNISHMENT 1066-1500
    • KNOWLEDGE
      • 1066 - Battle of Hastings
      • Legend of Robin Hood
    • LAWS
      • Forest Laws - Trees couldn't be cut down, people in the forest couldn't own arrows, bows or dogs, deer couldn't be killed
        • REASON: William loved the stags as if he was there father and he wanted to protect their habitat and control people
      • King's Peace - crimes were committed against the King's Peace rather than other people, you would be punished for breaking the King's Peace
        • REASON: To stamp his authority as a new King and control people by fear so that they wouldn't break the peace
    • CRIMES
      • Theft
      • Murder
      • Killing a Norman
      • Arson
      • Any crime that broke the King's Peace or Forest Laws
      • OUTLAWS - feared, stole from anyone, targeted churches, threatened victims
      • Highway Roobery
        • Folville gang
    • POLICING
      • NO POLICE FORCE
      • HUE AND CRY- every villager joined the hunt to find the criminal, if ignored you would be fined
      • THE CONSTABLE - would lead the Hue and Cry, not paid or full time, only held post for 1yr,appointed in 1250s
      • CORONER - (1190s) - enquire about all unnatural deaths
      • SHERIFF AND THE POSSE - track down and imprison criminals, investigated all other major crimes
      • CLAIM SANCTUARY - avoid being caught, safe place e.g. church
    • PUNISHMENTS
      • REBELS - executed without mercy
      • Murdrum Fine - if any Norman was killed, all the people in the region must join together to pay a fine
      • Trial by Combat - accused fights the accuser until one is killed or beaten - GOD DECIDES
      • Killing deer - being blinded
      • Breaking King's Peace - execution/fines
      • TRIAL BY ORDEAL ABOLISHED 1215
    • COURTS
      • Royal courts - royal judges visited 2-3 times a year to hear the most serious cases
      • Quarter sessions - Justices of the Peace -  local gentry and noblemen acted as judges four times a year, dealt with wide range of cases
      • Church courts - priests and churchmen tried
      • Private courts and manor courts - held by landowners, dealt with workers who hadn't done enough work and imprisoned criminals waiting royal courts
  • CRIMES
    • Theft
    • Murder
    • Killing a Norman
    • Arson
    • Any crime that broke the King's Peace or Forest Laws
    • OUTLAWS - feared, stole from anyone, targeted churches, threatened victims
    • Highway Roobery
      • Folville gang

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