Entertainment in the 1920s

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  • New forms of entertainment in the 1920s
    • Sport
      • It became a huge part of American lifestyle. 1920s known as 'The Golden Age of Sport'.
      • More leisure time due to time saving appliances. Many flocked to stadiums to see sporting events.
      • In 1924 67,000 went to Memorial Stadium to see Michigan VS Illinois football match. In 1926 145,000 saw boxing match between Dempsey and Tunney.
      • Sport was still segregated. Many African Americans had to form their own teams. In 1920 the Negro National Baseball League was formed.
      • Baseball became the most popular sport and gave rise to the most popular sporting star of the time, Babe Ruth. He had a major influence on the younger generation as he smoked and drank in public.
    • Radio
      • The radio grew massively in the 20s. In 1922 there was 500 stations across the USA.
      • The 1st national station was NBC set up in 1926.
      • 50 million people listened to the Dempsey VS Tunney boxing match.
      • People held 'Radio Parties' where friends and families could listen to the radio together.
      • By 1927 33% of money spent on furniture was spent on radios.
      • In 1923 to 1930, 60% of all American families purchased a radio.
    • Jazz Music
      • 1920s known as the 'Jazz Age' due to the popularity of jazz. Jazz was not new.
      • It originated from black slaves, who had been encouraged to sing to increase production.
        • It was known as 'blues', 'rag' and boogie-woogie'. By changing the beat and rhythms it became jazz.
      • Words in Jazz were associated with black sexual slang terms and due to this was not popular amongst white people especially the older generation.
      • Younger generations listened to jazz and rebelled against traditional beliefs. Women who were Flappers used the Jazz movement to rebel and challenge the traditional views of women. They listened to Jazz at speakeasies, smoked and drank alcohol in public.
    • Cinema
      • Silent flims had been around since the early years of the century. In 1927 the first sound film (a talkie), The Jazz Singer, was released in cinemas.
      • Movies offered escape and excitement from everyday life. It created culture and promoted actors and actresses, who became the first celebrities.
      • Actresses such as Clara Bow, the 'It Girl' symbolised the modern liberated woman. Comedic actors - Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton.
      • The cinema industry was centred in Hollywood, Los Angeles and was the 4th largest in terms of capital investment.
  • Baseball became the most popular sport and gave rise to the most popular sporting star of the time, Babe Ruth. He had a major influence on the younger generation as he smoked and drank in public.
  • Cinema
    • Silent flims had been around since the early years of the century. In 1927 the first sound film (a talkie), The Jazz Singer, was released in cinemas.
    • Movies offered escape and excitement from everyday life. It created culture and promoted actors and actresses, who became the first celebrities.
    • Actresses such as Clara Bow, the 'It Girl' symbolised the modern liberated woman. Comedic actors - Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton.
    • The cinema industry was centred in Hollywood, Los Angeles and was the 4th largest in terms of capital investment.

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