Nature

Poems and their quotations and how they link to the theme in John Clare's poetry of nature.

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  • Created by: R_S_E
  • Created on: 30-03-14 12:51
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  • Mixed metaphor of the clouds as rocks and desert enshrouding the sky, death? Nature is dangerous
  • Harshness of nature emphasising the power it has over people
  • "desolate", "enshroud", "threatening", "imprisonment", "bellowing", "din", "blustering"
    • Harshness of nature emphasising the power it has over people
  • LOVE / ADMIRATION OF NATURE
    • SUMMER TINTS
      • ‘When Summer’s mellowing pencil sweeps his shade’ 
        • Personification / metaphor of summer drawing nature = beauty / artistry
        • Sibilance conveys the flow of the art / flow of care free nature
      • ‘So sweet that shepherds from their bowers have crept / And stood delighted musing o’er the scene’ 
        • Romantic idea (register), poet can enjoy it without violating it
        • 'Crept' so as not to disturb - suggests respect
      • ‘While over the face of nature softly swept’ 
        • Painting metaphor: wind personified as painting a personified face of nature
      • Colour imagery related to art = admiration / love of nature's creation
    • SONNET: 'THE BARN DOOR IS OPEN'
      • "The hen's in the dust and the hog's in the dirt, / The mower is busy and stripped in his shirt'
        • Alliteration emphasising the natural and uninterrupted environment
        • Rhyming couplet emphasising the harmony between nature and humans
      • 'The maid's in the meadow and a-making the hay; / The ducks are a feeding and running about'
        • Alliteration showing the repetitive and simple action - working closely with nature
        • Parallel phrasing conveying how humans and animals can live in close proximity
    • THE ANTS
      • ‘ A swarm flocks round to help their fellow men’ 
        • ants are personifies do show that they have a superior society where all are equals and help, ‘swarm’ portraying their activity
      • ‘their ways / prove they have kings and laws’ 
        • metaphor for their order, they have a human like society which is to be admired
      • ‘Too fine for us to hear’ 
        • superior to us, we cannot understand their system because it is so much better than ours it is beyond our grasp
    • EMMONSALES HEATH
      • ‘Creation’s steps one’s wandering meets / untouched by those of man’ 
        • Personification / religious worship of nature, in harmony with nature as they wander
      • ‘In thy wild garb of other times’ / Still wildly threads its lawless bounds'
        • personification, ancient, typical Romantic idea of untamed land / paradox of clothed nature
        • enjambment emphasises the long life of nature, it isn’t constrained in any way
      • ‘And blooms that love what man forgets’ 
        • Personification - nature loves what man doesn't interfere with
      • ‘Stern Industry with stubborn pride / And wants unsatisfied’
        • personification as an enemy of nature, enjambment emphasises, nature is stopping expansion
    • “hides beneath the rotten hedge” 
      • Mysterious, protects itself, shy, builds homes in difficult conditions
    • SONNET: 'I FOUND A BALL OF GRASS AMONG THE HAY'
      • ‘She found her nest again among the hay’ 
        • Admiration for the way they rebuild despite human interference
      • ‘The water o’er pebbles scarce could run / And borad old cesspools glittered in the son’
        • Admiration for nature’s beauty
  • Nature
    • Conflict with Nature
      • THE FODDERING BOY
        • ‘crumping snows’ 
          • onomatopoeia emphasises the actions the boy must take to fight the cold environment
        • ‘And shakes the lodging snows from off his clothes’
          • personification of snow trying to stop him from working
        • ‘Then faces it again – and seeks the stack’
          • I n conflict with the weather to complete his job - personifies the weather (emphasised through enjambment - makes him pause)
          • alliteration for boy’s forceful actions to fight the conditions 
        • ‘And brawls to call the staring cattle round’
          • Angry shout suggesting an antagonistic relationship with nature
          • Indifference of nature to the boy’s suffering, don’t care that he is cold
      • GIPSY CAMP
        • ‘The Gipsy knocks his hands and tucks them up’ 
          • Assonance = physical discomfort from the cold
        • ‘Beneath the oak which breaks away the wind’ 
          • CONTRAST - here nature is a protector
        • "Half hid in snow"
          • Alliteration = battle through nature
          • Cushioning their home? (soft sound)
      • St. MARTIN'S EVE
        • "Huge-seeming rocks and deserts now enshroud"
          • Mixed metaphor of the clouds as rocks and desert enshrouding the sky, death? Nature is dangerous
        • "Winter's imprisonment is all begun"
          • Metaphor for entrapment indoors from harsh nature - nature can control the actions of people
        • "desolate", "enshroud", "threatening", "imprisonment", "bellowing", "din", "blustering"
          • "Rude winds... ill forsee... Who clingeth now to hope like shipwrecked folks at sea"
            • Nature didn't anticipate the wind damaging the landscape - power surprised itself
            • Simile of nature as shipwrecked at sea - winter is a harsh and powerful time that is a danger even to nature
        • SONNET: 'I FOUND A BALL OF GRASS AMONG THE HAY'
          • ‘With all her young ones hanging at her teats / She looked so odd and so grotesque to me’ 
            • Clare is not romanticising his account, rather telling it what as it is suggesting nature is more primitive than a source of spiritual inspiration 
          • "I ran and wondered what a thing could be"
            • doesn’t understand, wants knowledge
        • SONNET: THE HEDGEHOG
          • Social Protest
            • ‘And eat what dogs refuse’ 
              • Desperate position the gypsies are in which is emphasised the repetition of verbs like ‘hunt/savage’ which further suggest their poverty
            • ‘Nibble their fleshy teats and make them dry’ 
              • kind of hyperbole exaggerating the desperate situation the gypsies are in to show their extreme hunger and thirst
          • “I’ve seen it in their camps; they call it sweet,/Though black and bitter and unsavoury meat” 
            • admonition or disbelief at the lengths humans can go in their exploitation of nature
          • "It rolls up like a ball, a shapeless hog"
            • caesura to mark the action, survival instinct
            • LOVE / ADMIRATION OF NATURE
              • SUMMER TINTS
                • ‘When Summer’s mellowing pencil sweeps his shade’ 
                  • Personification / metaphor of summer drawing nature = beauty / artistry
                  • Sibilance conveys the flow of the art / flow of care free nature
                • ‘So sweet that shepherds from their bowers have crept / And stood delighted musing o’er the scene’ 
                  • Romantic idea (register), poet can enjoy it without violating it
                  • 'Crept' so as not to disturb - suggests respect
                • ‘While over the face of nature softly swept’ 
                  • Painting metaphor: wind personified as painting a personified face of nature
                • Colour imagery related to art = admiration / love of nature's creation
              • SONNET: 'THE BARN DOOR IS OPEN'
                • "The hen's in the dust and the hog's in the dirt, / The mower is busy and stripped in his shirt'
                  • Alliteration emphasising the natural and uninterrupted environment
                  • Rhyming couplet emphasising the harmony between nature and humans
                • 'The maid's in the meadow and a-making the hay; / The ducks are a feeding and running about'
                  • Alliteration showing the repetitive and simple action - working closely with nature
                  • Parallel phrasing conveying how humans and animals can live in close proximity
              • THE ANTS
                • ‘ A swarm flocks round to help their fellow men’ 
                  • ants are personifies do show that they have a superior society where all are equals and help, ‘swarm’ portraying their activity
                • ‘their ways / prove they have kings and laws’ 
                  • metaphor for their order, they have a human like society which is to be admired
                • ‘Too fine for us to hear’ 
                  • superior to us, we cannot understand their system because it is so much better than ours it is beyond our grasp
              • EMMONSALES HEATH
                • ‘Creation’s steps one’s wandering meets / untouched by those of man’ 
                  • Personification / religious worship of nature, in harmony with nature as they wander
                • ‘In thy wild garb of other times’ / Still wildly threads its lawless bounds'
                  • personification, ancient, typical Romantic idea of untamed land / paradox of clothed nature
                  • enjambment emphasises the long life of nature, it isn’t constrained in any way
                • ‘And blooms that love what man forgets’ 
                  • Personification - nature loves what man doesn't interfere with
                • ‘Stern Industry with stubborn pride / And wants unsatisfied’
                  • personification as an enemy of nature, enjambment emphasises, nature is stopping expansion
              • “hides beneath the rotten hedge” 
                • Mysterious, protects itself, shy, builds homes in difficult conditions
              • SONNET: 'I FOUND A BALL OF GRASS AMONG THE HAY'
                • ‘She found her nest again among the hay’ 
                  • Admiration for the way they rebuild despite human interference
                • ‘The water o’er pebbles scarce could run / And borad old cesspools glittered in the son’
                  • Admiration for nature’s beauty
          • Juxtaposing the hedgehog’s timidity ‘hides’ ‘creeps away’ with the violent actions of the gypsies ‘hunt the field’ ‘hunt them out’ stresses the conflict and vulnerability of the hedgehog
      • Mystery of Nature
        • THE LANDRAIL
          • “we know”, “we hear”, men “wonder” and “guess”
            • Repeated verbs of menatal activity suggest that the bird is beyond human power
          • ‘And now I hear it in the grass… And now ‘tis in the grain’ 
            • Aural imagery is juxtaposed with visual imagery of physical movement ‘peep / look’ which is used by Clare to describe the vain efforts of humans to find the bird 
            • Like God the bird is omnipresent
          • ‘’Tis like a fancy everywhere, A sort of living doubt’
            • symbolic of God, you can never see it but you must trust that it exists
        • SUMMER MOODS
          • ‘dewy thorn’ 
            • paradoxical image of nature both being soft and sharp
          • ‘like voices underground’ 
            • dead?
          • I love to muse o’er meadows newly mown’ 
            • Alliteration & assonance = soft atmosphere created with seductive olfactory image, muse is on the Romantic register
          • Right glad to meet the evening’s dewy veil’ 
            • Feminine softness / seductiveness of death/darkness, relief to meet them
          • ‘The fairy like and  seldom-seen landrail’
            • Simile - almost mythical = mystery
          • ‘hid as thoughts unborn’ 
            • Quail is a simile for unconscious thoughts which are ambiguous as either hopes or anxieties
        • SONNET: 'I FOUND A BALL OF GRASS AMONG THE HAY'
          • ‘With all her young ones hanging at her teats / She looked so odd and so grotesque to me’ 
            • Clare is not romanticising his account, rather telling it what as it is suggesting nature is more primitive than a source of spiritual inspiration 
          • "I ran and wondered what a thing could be"
            • doesn’t understand, wants knowledge

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