Mr Birling - Character Profile - Inspector Calls - English Literature

A mindmap summerising the character of Mr Birling.

HideShow resource information
  • Created by: Emily
  • Created on: 15-05-13 19:22
View mindmap
  • Mr Birling
    • 'heavy looking, rather portentous man in his early fifties but rather provincial in his speech'
      • His 'provincial speech' shows us that he has married above his class.
        • His wife often disapproves of what he says, and tries to silence him this is noticeable in the first few pages particularly.
    • 'easy manners'
      • Thinks of himself has a great local personality.
        • Magistrate
        • Possible knighthood
        • Uses this to impress people. Or even intimidate them.
          • Always tries to impress his social superiors.
            • When talking to Gerald 'it's exactly the same port as your father gets...'
        • Then contradicts himself at the end of the novel, says he is disliked enough for someone to pull cruel joke on him,
          • 'There are people in this town who dislike me enough to do that.'
          • Eric reveals 'you're not the kind of father a chap can go to...'
            • Not been a good father, his relationship with his children is broken.
        • Mr Birling
          • 'heavy looking, rather portentous man in his early fifties but rather provincial in his speech'
            • His 'provincial speech' shows us that he has married above his class.
              • His wife often disapproves of what he says, and tries to silence him this is noticeable in the first few pages particularly.
          • 'easy manners'
            • Thinks of himself has a great local personality.
              • Magistrate
              • Possible knighthood
              • Uses this to impress people. Or even intimidate them.
                • Always tries to impress his social superiors.
                  • When talking to Gerald 'it's exactly the same port as your father gets...'
              • Then contradicts himself at the end of the novel, says he is disliked enough for someone to pull cruel joke on him,
                • 'There are people in this town who dislike me enough to do that.'
                • Eric reveals 'you're not the kind of father a chap can go to...'
                  • Not been a good father, his relationship with his children is broken.
          • Attempts to take control over the Inspector.
            • He talks of his high class friends
            • 'Don't stammer and yammer at me again man, I've almost had it with you people...'
          • Used by Priestly as a puppet for dramatic irony.
            • Mr Birling's  capitalist speech
            • Titanic - 'unsinkable'
            • 'silly little war scares'
            • 'There'll be peace and prosperity and rapid progress everywhere..'
            • The audience in 1945 knew all this was untrue, making us doubt Birling's judgement.
            • Birling disagrees with Captial views so mocks them by making a fool of Birling through dramatic irony.
          • Only concerned with business and his own personal circumstances.
            • 'A man has to make his own way...'
            • Happy for his daughter's engagement as it secures a business deal. He and his larger rival company will merge
            • Throughout the investigation he is only concerned with how any scandal will be avoided.
              • Wants Eric's thieving hushed up.
              • Accuses Sheila of being disloyalty to the family.
              • Never admits any social responsibility and learns nothing.
                • See's his part in her death as a part of business.
          • Typical of the older generation. Not open to change and socialism.
    • Attempts to take control over the Inspector.
      • He talks of his high class friends
      • 'Don't stammer and yammer at me again man, I've almost had it with you people...'
    • Used by Priestly as a puppet for dramatic irony.
      • Mr Birling's  capitalist speech
      • Titanic - 'unsinkable'
      • 'silly little war scares'
      • 'There'll be peace and prosperity and rapid progress everywhere..'
      • The audience in 1945 knew all this was untrue, making us doubt Birling's judgement.
      • Birling disagrees with Captial views so mocks them by making a fool of Birling through dramatic irony.
    • Only concerned with business and his own personal circumstances.
      • 'A man has to make his own way...'
      • Happy for his daughter's engagement as it secures a business deal. He and his larger rival company will merge
      • Throughout the investigation he is only concerned with how any scandal will be avoided.
        • Wants Eric's thieving hushed up.
        • Accuses Sheila of being disloyalty to the family.
        • Never admits any social responsibility and learns nothing.
          • See's his part in her death as a part of business.
    • Typical of the older generation. Not open to change and socialism.

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar English Literature resources:

See all English Literature resources »See all An Inspector Calls resources »