Millicent Fawcett

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  • Millicent Garrett Fawcett
    • Personal
      • Born in Aldeburgh, Suffolk on 11 June 1847
      • Highly privileged background
        • Parents free of the dominant ideology of male supremacy.
      • Feminist.
      • Marriage
        • April 1865 Fawcett met Henry Fawcett, 14 yrs her senior.
          • Married in 1867.
        • Henry Fawcett
          • Professor at Cambridge & Radical Liberal MP in Brighton.
          • Agreed with Millicent's views
          • Died in November 1884.
        • 1868 Philippa was born.
      • March 1919 retired from presidency of NUWSS
      • NUWSS - National Union of Societies for Equal Citizenship
      • Died 5 August 1929
    • Joining the Struggle
      • Present at Ladies' Gallery in the House of Commons
        • When Mill introduced his amendment to the 1867 Representation of the People Bill in May 1867
      • July 1867 joined National Society for Women's Suffrage.
        • Joined executive committee.
          • Not an inspiring orator.
    • Arguments
      • Women hold responsible posts in society. Therefore should be trusted with vote.
      • Women pay taxes & should have a say how they are spent.
      • Parliament made laws for all to obey so should take part in making them laws.
      • Wealthy women employed workmen who could vote so why couldn't women.
    • Early Career
      • Acted as Henry's guide & secretary
      • Ran 2 households.
      • First article on women's education in Macmillan's magazine in 1868
      • Founder of Newnham College for women in Cambridge in 1875
      • Published textbook Political Economy for Beginners
        • Ten editions, several languages, 2 novels.
      • Campaigned in favour of the Married Womens Property Bill & repeal of the Contagious Diseases Act
    • Organisation
      • No effective forum to challenge the movement
      • Joined Central Committee for Women's Suffrage
        • In 1888 split in ranks & MF led the faction opposed to change
      • Special Appeal Committee
        • President in 1893
        • Urged suffrage societies to work together
    • NUWSS
      • 1897 National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies
      • Men were won over by arguments.
        • Welcomed their support.
      • Travelled to South Africa in 1901
        • Concentration camps in Boer War.
        • Head of investigating committee.
          • Enhanced cause of female suffrage. No woman ever had such an important role.
      • 1897 6 societies, 1905 - 305, few years later 50000 ppl
      • Growing number of MPs thought they should get the vote.
      • President 1907
    • WWI
      • Put patriotism before the vote
      • 1917 new Representation of the Peoples Act
        • Women suffrage clause
          • Women 30+ got the vote, still less than men  (21+) but great breakthrough
      • Membership fell to 30000 & unity of organisation was compromised

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