Medieval Medical Knowledge

A detailed mind map of Medieval medical knowledge, including Christian and Muslim developments.

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  • Medical knowledge
    • In the west
      • Many Greek and Roman books were lost.
      • Any remaining knowledge was replaced with speculation and superstition
        • disease was caused by demons, sin, bad smells, astrology and the stars, stagnant water, the Jewish people etc.
        • Believed life was controlled by God and his Saints.
          • Guy de Chauliac, the Pope's doctor, blamed the Black Death on a conjunction of Saturn, Jupiter and Mars.
    • After 1100
      • Even after universities had been developed, lectures on anatomy still involved limited to basic principles.
      • The Church said that Galen's ideas were so correct, there was no need to investigate further.
      • Dissection being forbidden lead to a number of errors being made in medical knowledge.
        • Italian doctor Alderotti claimed that combing the hair 'comforts the brain.'
    • Muslim middle east
      • Doctors like Al-Razi conserved the ideas of the Greeks and Romans.
      • Later, Muslim doctors such as Ibn-Zuhr and Ibn al-Nafis began to challenge old and develop new ideas.
        • However these ideas spread slowly to Europe as The Church was at war with Islam.
          • An exception being a book by Ibn Sina called 'The Canon Medicine'.
    • Medieval Medicine through time
      • Surgery
        • On the Battle field
          • Surgeons' skills were in much demand.
            • This actually led to an progression in surgery, as new instruments and methods were developing.
        • Performed by barber-surgeons, not trained doctors
          • On the Battle field
            • Surgeons' skills were in much demand.
              • This actually led to an progression in surgery, as new instruments and methods were developing.

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