Politics, Liberalism Mary Wollstonecraft

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  • Mary Wollstonecraft
    • She was the first supportive of the french revolution who slogan was 'liberty, equality and freedom', however she was shocked to find out that women were excluded from public education in France too.
    • Reason attributable to men and women
      • She believed men and women were rational interdependent beings
      • She believed women acted the way they did in front of men because they were taught beauty is the most important as this is what gets you a husband
      • It was a social expectation for women to act this way not because they were born intellectually inferior to men
    • Formal Equality
      • In order to be free men and women should both have the same legal political status.
      • In particular women should not be stopped from accessing public education
    • "Taught from their infancy that beauty is a womans sceptre, the ind shapes itself to the body, and roaming around its guilt cage, only seeks to adorn prison."
    • "Having their thoughts constantly directed to the most insignificant part of themselves"
    • Modern liberal
      • She believed the state should intervene to allow women to be educated.
    • She believed in developmental individualism as the state should intervene to help women in particular live to their potential
    • She believed in rationalism, men and women are rational and can make their own decisions
    • Believes in foundational equality. People have inalienable rights which cannot be taken away..
      • Believe that the government has a positive role to play in the economy. Keynesian economic management where the government pumps money into the economy during a recession
    • Believes in positive freedom, leaving he poorest alone does not make them free. State intervention is needed to help people reach their potential

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