Macbeth - guilt quotations

  • Created by: XLeahxx
  • Created on: 02-05-17 21:16
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  • Macbeth - guilt quotations.
    • " ’T is the eye of childhood, that fears a painted devil"
      • What Macbeth fears is much more fearful that the devil himself. it is his inner guilt.
      • "painted", portrayed as a devil
      • by comparing Macbeth to a child it emasculates him, making him feel less of a man.
      • devil being mentioned shows more supernatural forces at work
    • "A little water clears us of this deed"
      • Lady Macbeth appears to feel no guilt.
      • this is later disproved as she cannot bare any more of her guilt further on and kills herself
      • believes that just a bit of water will hide all of their sins.
      • "here's the smell of blood still" lady Macbeth and Macbeth feel an immense amount of guilt - water did not conceal what they did.
    • "theres daggers in mens smiles, the near in blood the nearer bloody"
      • Donalbaine has understood the situation clearly, he understands that they are being made for fools, and that they are wanted dead
      • The use of dagger brings us back to Macbeths soliloquy and how he envisioned the dagger, that led him to murder; the blood representing his guilt.
      • no one can be trusted, just as Macbeth could never of been trusted. people are deceitful.
    • "Out, damned spot! out i say"
      • here we can see, yet again that lady Macbeth can not get rid of her guilt.
      • the audience begin to see that her mind is beginning to deteriorate as she cannot take any more
      • a line spoken by Lady Macbeth as she sleepwalks. even in her dreams she cannot escape the guilt - it has taken over her mind.
      • At the beginning of the play Lady Macbeth taunts Macbeth and tells him not to be a coward, after Duncan's murder the roles are reversed as Lady Macbeth is left feeling remorse for her actions and pain.

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