Macbeth

  • Created by: ConorD272
  • Created on: 19-03-19 17:58
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  • Macbeth
    • Act 1
      • Scene 1
        • Three witches meet in a deserted place with thunder and lightning.
        • "Thunder and lightning" this is pathetic fallacy which show that something bad is going to happen
        • "Fair is foul and foul is fair" it shows corruption. It's a leitmotif and an oxymoron. It shows the natural order has been disturbed
      • Scene 2
        • Macbeth and Banquo are fighting a Norwegian invasion. Duncan is impressed by Macbeth's fighting and decides to make him Thane of Cawdor
        • "Doubly redoubled strikes upon the foe". Macbeth is praised for his bloodthirsty behaviour but the irony is that his violence will cause his downfall.
      • Scene 3
        • Macbeth and Banquo meet the witches. They predict that Macbeth will become Thane of Cawdor and then King and predict Banquo's descendants will be kings. Macbeth is then told he is to be named Thane of Cawdor by Rosse and Angus
        • "So foul and fair a day I have not seen" these words echo the final lines of Act 1, Scene 1. This suggests that Macbeth's fate is linked with the witches.
      • Scene 4
        • Duncan thanks Macbeth and Banquo for defeating the enemy armies. Duncan makes Malcolm heir.
        • "Is execution done on Cawdor" hinting at the future, Macbeth will take the title of a traitor and will betray Duncan.
        • "He was a gentleman on whom I built an absolute trust", people may seem good and trustworthy but they don't always turn out to be. This is ironic as he misjudges Macbeth.
        • "Stars, hide your fires"  By talking in rhyming couplets it emphasises his dark intentions and his link with the witches.
      • Scene 5
        • Lady Macbeth receives a letter from Macbeth telling her about the witches prophecies. She begins to plot Duncan's murder.
        • "Look like the innocent flower but be the serpent under it" Lady Macbeth is trying to encourage Macbeth to deceive and betray King Duncan
      • Scene 6
        • King Duncan arrives at Macbeth's castle and is greeted by Macbeth and his wife. Macbeth and his wife are nice to the king to disguise the fact they're plotting to kill him.
        • "Our honoured hostess!" is ironic as the audience know that he is going to be murdered by Macbeth.
      • Scene 7
        • Macbeth decides against killing Duncan as he is a good man and he probably won't get away with it. However, Lady Macbeth convinces him to do it by framing the guards. Macbeth agrees.
        • "His virtues will plead like angels" it suggests Duncan's righteousness makes Macbeth feel even guiltier about his plans.
    • Act 2
      • Scene 1
        • Macbeth comes across Banquo and Fleance walking at night. They talk about the witches' predictions. Macbeth then starts to hallucinate a dagger  and leaves to kill Duncan
        • "Mine eyes are made the fools" this shows that Macbeth isn't sure if what he's seeing is real. The audience can't tell if it's the witches or Macbeth imagination
      • Scene 2
        • Macbeth has killed Duncan and is overcome with guilt. Lady Macbeth goes back to finish the job(frames the guards). They both end up with blood on their hands.
        • "I shame to wear a heart so white". seh is calling Macbeth weak and questions his masculinity when he just killed someone not her. It's ironic as later on (Act5, Scene 1) she becomes ,mad with guilt
      • Scene 3
        • The porter  provides some dark comic relief  from the bloody chaos of the previous scene  and before the discovery of Duncan's murder. Malcolm and Donalbain run away.
        • "Who's there i'th'name of Beelzebub?" The porter pretends to be the gatekeeper to hell. This emphasises the evil things happen in Macbeth's castle.
        • "There's daggers in men's smiles" this suggests that people hide their true intentions. He says "men" which suggests he doesn't suspect Lady Macbeth. Echoes Lady Macbeth (Act 1, Scene 5)
    • Act 3
      • Scene 1
        • Macbeth is worried about Banquo's descendants becoming Kings. He orders two murderers to kill Banquo and his son.
        • "Banquo, thy soul's flight" He speaks in rhyming couplets which makes him seem decisive and reminds the audience of the end of Act 2, Scene 1.
      • Scene 2
        • The Macbeths feel insecure and guilty. Macbeth hints to his wife that he's going to kill Banquo.
        • "Make our faces vizards to our hearts" Macbeth and Lady Macbeth have switched roles - he is giving the commands now. Echoes what Lady Macbeth said (Act 1, Scene 5)
        • "While night's b;lack agents to their preys do rouse" this echoes Lady Macbeth's soliloquy (Act 1, Scene 5). They both call on the darkness and refer to evil spirits. This suggests Macbeth is becoming more like his wife.
      • Scene 3
        • The two murderers are joined by another one. They ambush Banquo and his son. Banquo dies but Fleance escapes.
        • "But who did bid thee join with us?" Macbeth sends a third murderer because he doesn't trust the other two. It suggests he is anxious and paranoid.
      • Scene 4
        • Macbeth hosts a feast but it is ruined as he starts seeing Banquo's ghost and starts yelling at it.
        • "But now they rise again" By commenting on tbe dead rising, it emphasises that the natural order has been disturbed. Like what Rosse and the Old man say (Act 2, Scene 4)
        • "Blood will have blood"Macbeth will pay/ be punished. He is fearful that the murders might be his downfall.
      • Scene 5
        • Hecate is angry that the witches have been acting without her. She decides to make a spell to ruin Macbeth.
        • "He shall spurn fate" Macbeth thinks he can control his destiny by murdering Duncan and Banquo. It suggests that Macbeth's ambition and over-confidence will be responsible for his downfall.
      • Scene 6
        • Lennox and a lord are discussing how Malcolm is in England getting an army to attack Macbeth
    • Act 4
      • Scene 1
        • Macbeth visits the witches and he is shown three apparitions and then another of Banquo's descendants being king.
        • "Who can impress the forest?" Macbeth is foolish to trust the evil witches. He feels secure as no-one can move an entire forest
      • Scene 2
        • Rosse talks to Lady Macduff about why Macduff left his family. After Rosse leaves murderers break in and kill Lady Macduff and her son.
        • "To leave his wife, to leave his babes" she feels betrayed - Macduff's abandoned his family. It suggests he is more loyal to his country than to his family
      • Scene 3
        • Malcolm is in England with Malcolm. Malcolm suspects he is a spy and tests him. Rosse enters and tells Macduff his family were murdered.
        • "Such sanctity hath heaven given" King Edward of England is shown as saintly, contrast to Macbeth. Shakespeare could be trying to please King James by calling the king saintly.
    • Act 5
      • Scene 1
        • Lady Macbeth is sleepwalking. She is consumed with guilt and dreams about the night of Duncan's death.
        • "Out, damned spot !" She is overwhelmed with guilt - in her dreams she can't get the blood of her hands.l Contrasts with her attitude earlier (Act 2, scene 2).
      • Scene 2
        • The Scottish thanes are talking about the arrival of the English army and how unpopular Macbeth is.
        • "Near Birnam Wood shall we well meet" This reminds the audience of apparition three. It hints that Birnam Wood might actually come to Dunsinane.
      • Scene 3
        • Macbeth hears about the army that's about to attack. The doctor sys Lady Macbeth can't be cured.
        • "I have lived long enough" even though Macbeth is confident, he is beginning to despair. He seems to know the end is coming
      • Scene 4
        • The English army is getting ready for attack. Malcolm tells everyone to cut a branch from Birnam Wood.
      • Scene 5
        • Macbeth is waiting for the army to attack. He finds out Lady Macbeth is dead and that Birnam Wood is coming.
        • "I 'gin to be aweary of the sun" Macbeth is tired of the sun - he doesn't care if he lives or dies.
      • Scene 6
        • Malcolm orders the soldiers to throw down the branches and attack.
      • Scene 7
        • Macbeth fights and kills Young Siward. Macduff then enters looking for Macbeth.
        • "YOUNG SIWARD is slain" it reminds the audience that Macbeth is a great warrior - like in Act 1, Scene 2.
        • "Exit. Alarums." the number of entrances and exits creates a sense of confusion in the battle.
      • Scene 8
        • Macbeth and Macduff meet. Macbeth learns Macduff was born by caesarean section. They then  fight and Macbeth is slain.
        • "I will not yield" Macbeth doesn't want to live and be humiliated, so he chooses to fight. He returns to being like the brave hero he once was.
      • Scene 9
        • Siward learns of his son's death and Macduff enters with Macbeth's head. Malcolm is made king and rewards everyone who fought with him.
        • "The usurper's cursed head" the play begins and ends with the beheading of a traitor. The natural order has been restored.

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