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  • Created by: laiba26
  • Created on: 26-02-17 18:13
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  • Language in Ozymandias
    • Ozymandias: 'Ozy' comes from the Greek 'Ozium', meaning to 'breath. 'Mandias' comes from the Greek 'mandate' meaning to 'rule'. Even the title suggesets power and control.
    • 'I met a traveller' Shelley begins the poem by detaching himself from the story being told. He wants to immediately make the point that 'this is not an open cirticism of teh British monarchy'. However, the poem is clearly a thin veiled attack.
    • 'Sunk' 'shatterd' 'Frown' 'Wrinkled' 'Sneer' This plethora of deeply negative language is used to make it very clear that the poem is an attack and not a praising up of the powerful.
    • 'Cold command' The alliterative repitition of the hard 'c' sounds reflects the harsh nature of Ozymandias
    • 'Boundless and bare' Alliteration is used to emphasise the emptiness
    • 'The lone and level sands stretch far away' The desert outlives the statue
      • It could also be said that teh sands symbolise Ozymandias' thoughts; his statue is sikning into the sand which is a direct correlation being deluded into this idea that his omnipotence is everlasting.
    • The poem could also be Shelley's way of criticising religion
      • The hand that 'mocked them'. 'mocked' can mean to create and make.
        • This quote is a play on the idiom 'to bite the hand that feeds you' which means that you should not criticise the institutions and people in positions of authority if you are dependent on them. This is ironic because of how Shelley is crirticising George III, and highlights both the British Monarch and Ozy as despotic, tyrannical rulers.
      • Religious references
        • 'King of Kings' Jesus was often called this and the setting of the desert can remidn the reader of the temptations Jesus faced in the desert.
    • The past tense of 'mocked, stamped, commanded' refer to the pasat actions of Ozymandias, somethign which he can no longer do now which shows a loss of power.

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