Language Diversity - Accents, Dialect, Social Class

  • Created by: Natalie
  • Created on: 05-03-19 16:59
View mindmap
  • Language Diversity- Accent, dialect, social class
    • Key Terminology
      • Sociolect: a form of talking that is specific to a certain social group
      • Idiolect: Individual way of speaking
      • Dialect: words specific to a certain region/area
      • Accent: how words are pronounced in a certain area.
      • Post vocalic /r/: pronouncing an /r/ after a vowel where there is a r in the spelling e.g. farm, horse
    • A prescriptivist is concerned with the preservation of language.
    • Multicultural London English (MLE)
      • A variety combining elements of the language of different ethnic groups particularly afro-Caribbean English.
      • Variety arose in London but has spread to different prts of the UK
      • First emerged in the late 20th century
    • Multicultural Urban British English (MUBE)
      • Features
        • Extreme fronting of goose vowels
        • word pronunciation e.g they becomes dey
        • use of pragmatic marker 'you get me'
    • Labov
      • Martha's Vineyard study
        • Recorded data from 69 people - range of sexes and ages
        • People in rural areas more likely to use central vowels as well as people with positive attitudes.
      • New York Department Study
        • recorded speakers from the lower East side ad analysed 5 phonological variables
        • In the more expensive store the customers paid more attention to their direct pronunciation of the /r/ sound.
        • Confirmed linguistic variation was not random and unstructured
    • Trudgill's Norwich Study
      • Late 1960's
      • Interest to know if Labov's findings were true in the UK
      • People in lower socio economic status were more likely to use non-standard linguist variants
      • Women more likely to use standard linguistic variants in formal settings
      • Explored Norwich dialect
    • Malcolm Petyt's Bradford Dialect Case Study
      • 1985
      • Study into the sociologcal viable associated with dropping /h/ and its link with social class
      • Lower the social class, the more likely they were to h-drop
      • People were more likely to alter their accent to conform more to RP as they moved up through the social groups.
        • Led to hyper-correction in some cases
    • Milroy's Belfast Study
      • Investigated three working class communities in Belfast
        • All communities had high incidences of unemployment
      • Non-standard forms were less evident in women's speech as they belonged to less dense social networks
      • Men whose speech showed high usage of non-standard forms were found to belong to tight-knit social networks.
    • A descriptivist believes that the correctness depends on context rather than just rules.
  • Malcolm Petyt's Bradford Dialect Case Study
    • 1985
    • Study into the sociologcal viable associated with dropping /h/ and its link with social class
    • Lower the social class, the more likely they were to h-drop
    • People were more likely to alter their accent to conform more to RP as they moved up through the social groups.
      • Led to hyper-correction in some cases

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar English Language resources:

See all English Language resources »See all Language variation and discourses resources »