Keats poetry

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  • Keats poetry
    • Lamia
      • structure
        • frame story outlines the theme/moral message from Keats
          • 'nor grew they pale, as moral lovers do'
        • enjambment
      • form
        • heroic couplets + iambic pentameter
          • iambic = an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable - pentameter indicates that a line has five of these couples
          • without the flowing syllable's the poem would be stilted/unsettled and distract from the story
        • epic poem
          • long narrative poem
      • language
        • vivid/evocative description - positive + negative at the same time = distorted/confusing
          • e.g. 'eclips'd her crescents and lick'd up her stars'
        • mentions  magic/illusions often
          • e.g in wedding scene: 'haunting music...faery-roof...charm might fade...lucid...fuming...smoke'
            • reminds us that it is all an illusion - and its fragile = appolonious can easily shatter it (e.g.  smoke = not a permanent state)
              • setting
                • mythological
                  • = plots time and theme + gives way to frame story and idea of moral vs immortal love
      • setting
        • mythological
          • = plots time and theme + gives way to frame story and idea of moral vs immortal love
      • voice
        • omniscient judgmental narrator
          • informal storyteller : 'but ah' , 'we shall see'
    • La Belle Dame Sans Merci
      • structure
        • shortened 4th line =  sense of intrigue/ mystery because we aren't given all the information
        • rhythm and pace is repetitive =  men keep repeating this cycle of falling in love
      • form
        • ballad = delivers moral message
          • also ballad's are typically love poems = highlights the fact that this isn't = makes us question the love/infatuation
      • language
        • use of archaic language = authenticity of medieval setting
        • metaphor - 'Lilly on thy brow'
        • assonance - adds haunting sound quality
        • repetition of 'faery' and 'elfin' = mystical
        • emotive lang: 'wild..lulled...wept...horrid waning'
      • setting
        • 'harvest's done' = winter
          • why is he there?
          • desolate frigid landscape = knights mental state
        • medieval era suggests myth/legend
          • = highlights the moral message
      • voice
        • unknown (reliable?) narrator
        • present tense + 1st person
          • without the narrator we wouldn't question the knights story
        • knights story told through direct speech
          • unreliable, 1st person, past tense
      • context
        • expression of guilt over leaving Fanny Brawne
        • expresses idea that perfect love cannot  coexist with the outside world
          • e.g. death /illness forcing him to leave F.B
          • knight's story = men falling in love (cant cope -  men in his dream are man who have fallen in love and it has ruined them)
    • The Eve of St. Agnes
      • Structure
        • switches between characters
        • each  stanza has a clear image = tableau effect
        • eve = confined to one night = sense of pace/movement
      • form
        • regular stanzas/consistent meter + rhyme scheme = no one stanza is more important than another
      • Language
        • lots of description = pictorial effect
          • each  stanza has a clear image = tableau effect
          • e.g. 'silver snarling trumpets
            • adjectives, alliteration,  syballance
        • synaesthesia - describing visual with physical
          • e.g. 'languid moon
      • setting
        • time setting
          • one night = confined = tension/pace/movement
          • The eve of st Agnes = ritual = events couldn't happen any other night
        • winter - pathetic fallacy - e.g. sharp sleet against the window panes'
      • voice
        • omniscient narrator = all the information
        • stays in the castle after M+P leave and say the story happened 'long ago
          • = sense of fable type story = highlights the moral message
  • It keeps the poem moving forward and is often used to soften a rhyme
    • enjambment

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