Types of judges and qualification

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  • Created by: 10ebew
  • Created on: 18-04-16 11:10
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  • Judges
    • Superior judges
      • Justices of the supreme court - sit in supreme court
      • Lord justices of appeal - sit in court of appeal
      • High court judges or puisne - sit in 3 divisions of high court
    • Inferior judges
      • circuit judges - sit in crown and county court
      • Recorders - work part - time in crown court but few may hear cases in county court
      • District judges - hear small claims and other matters in county court
      • District judges (Magistrates' court) - sit in Magistrates' courts in major towns and cities
    • Qualifications
      • Justices of the supreme court
        • appointed from those who hold high judicial office or qualified in senior courts for at least 15 years
        • can also be appointed from those who qualify to appear in courts in Scotland and northern Ireland for at least 15 years
      • Lord justices of appeal
        • qualified as barrister or solicitor and experience in law for at least 7 years or have been an existing high court judge
        • nearly all have been appointed from existing high court jugdes
        • not until 2007 that 1st solicitor was appointed and since then has been promoted and sits as a justice of the supreme court
      • High court judges
        • qualified as barrister or solicitor and experience in law for at least 7 years or have been a circuit judge for at least 2 years
        • prior to 1990 only people who had been a barrister for at least 10 years were eligible
        • 1st solicitor to become a high court judge was 1993 and 2nd in 2000
        • majority of high court judges have been barristers
      • Circuit judges
        • qualified as barrister or solicitor and experience in law for at least 7 years
        • Recorders, district judges or tribunal judges are also eligible
        • provisions have widened pool of potential judges and are gradually leading to a better cross - section at this level
        • usual route - recorder then promoted to circuit judge (18% are former solicitors
      • Recoreders
        • part - time post
        • qualified as barrister or solicitor and experience in law for at least 7 years
        • usually appointed as a recorder in training then after 2/3 years apply to be appointed as recorder
        • sits as judge for 20 days a year
        • appointment for 5 years - most work in crown court but possible to sit in county court
      • District judges
        • qualified as barrister or solicitor and experience in law for at least 5 years or have been a deputy district judge
        • majority of DJ's in county court are former solicitors
        • DJ's in mags need same qualifications
        • about 2/3 are former solicitors
        • usual to have sat part -time as deputy DJ before being considered for position
        • under tribunals, court and enforcement act 2007 ILEX fellows are now eligible to be appointed as deputy DJ's

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