J&H

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    • l
      • “But the temptation of a discovery so singular and profound at last overcame the suggestions of alarm.”
      • "I never saw a man so distressed as you were by my will; unless it were that hide-bound pedant, Lanyon, at what he called my scientific heresies.”
      • “Only on one point were they agreed; and that was the haunting sense of unexpressed deformity with which the fugitive impressed his beholders.”
      • "O God!" I screamed, and "O God!" again and again; for there before my eyes—pale and shaken, and half fainting, and groping before him with his hands, like a man restored from death—there stood Henry Jekyll!”
      • “But the temptation of a discovery so singular and profound at last overcame the suggestions of alarm.” (Chapter 10) Jekyll knew he was taking a risk experimenting on himself, but his desire for discovery overtook any of his worries.
      • “In this character, it was frequently his fortune to be the last reputable acquaintance and the last good influence in the lives of downgoing men.”
      • “At sight of Mr. Utterson, he sprang up from his chair and welcomed him with both hands.”
      • "I have buried one friend to-day," he thought: "what if this should cost me another?" And then he condemned the fear as a disloyalty, and broke the seal.” (
      • “You could see by his looks that he cherished for Mr. Utterson a sincere and warm affection.”
      • "But it is more than ten years since Henry Jekyll became too fanciful for me. He began to go wrong, wrong in mind; and though of course I continue to take an interest in him for old sake's sake, as they say, I see and I have seen devilish little of the man.”
    • l
      • “In this character, it was frequently his fortune to be the last reputable acquaintance and the last good influence in the lives of downgoing men.”
      • “For my man was a fellow that nobody could have to do with, a really damnable man; and the person that drew the cheque is the very pink of the proprieties, celebrated too, and (what makes it worse) one of your fellows who do what they call good.”
      • "This Master Hyde, if he were studied," thought he, "must have secrets of his own; black secrets, by the look of him; secrets compared to which poor Jekyll's worst would be like sunshine."
      • "This Master Hyde, if he were studied," thought he, "must have secrets of his own; black secrets, by the look of him; secrets compared to which poor Jekyll's worst would be like sunshine." (
    • y
      • “Both sides of me were in dead earnest; I was no more myself when I laid aside restraint and plunged in shame, than when I laboured, in the eye of day, at the futherance of knowledge or the relief of sorrow and suffering.”
      • “If each, I told myself, could be housed in separate identities, life would be relieved of all that was unbearable.”
      • “I knew myself, at the first breath of this new life, to be more wicked, tenfold more wicked, sold a slave to my original evil; and the thought, in that moment, braced and delighted me like wine. I stretched out my hands, exulting in the freshness of these sensations; and in the act, I was suddenly aware that I had lost in stature.”
      • “I had now two characters as well as two appearances, one was wholly evil, and the other was still the old Henry Jekyll, that incongruous compound.”
      • Jekyll sates as though fact: "man is not truly one, but truly two"
    • n
      • if ever I read Satan's signature upon a face, it is on that of your new friend."
      • “Whilst he had always been, known for charities, he was now no less distinguished for religion.”
      • “The pangs of transformation had not done tearing him, before Henry Jekyll, with streaming tears of gratitude and remorse, had fallen upon his knees and lifted his clasped hands to God.”
      • "I never saw a circle of such hateful faces; and there was the man in the middle, with a kind of black sneering coolness—frightened to, I could see that—but carrying it off, sir, really like Satan."
      • “He was austere with himself; drank gin when he was alone, to mortify a taste for vintages; and though he enjoyed the theatre, had not crossed the doors of one for twenty years.
      • in spite of his collected manner, that he was wrestling against the approaches of the hysteria—"I understood, a drawer ..."
      • “It was Hyde, after all, and Hyde alone, that was guilty.
      • “Hence it came about that I concealed my pleasures; and that when I reached years of reflection, and began to look round me and take stock of my progress and position in the world, I stood already committed to a profound duplicity of me.”
      • “It was Hyde, after all, and Hyde alone, that was guilty. Jekyll was no worse; he woke again to his good qualities seemingly unimpaired; he would even make haste, where it was possible, to undo the evil done by Hyde. And thus his conscience slumbered.”
      • “My devil had been long caged, he came out roaring.”
      • "We told the man we could and would make such a scandal out of this as should make his name stink from one end of London to the other. If he had any friends or any credit, we undertook that he should lose them."
      • I was the first that could plod in the public eye with a load of genial respectability, and in a moment, like a schoolboy, ***** off these lendings and spring headlong into the sea of liberty.
      • “And next moment, with ape-like fury, he was trampling his victim under foot and hailing down a storm of blows, under which the bones were audibly shattered and the body jumped upon the roadway. At the horror of these sights and sounds, the maid fainted.”
      • “Well, sir, the two ran into one another naturally enough at the corner; and then came the horrible part of the thing; for the man trampled calmly over the child's body and left her screaming on the ground."
      • “And then all of a sudden he broke out in a great flame of anger, stamping with his foot, brandishing the cane, and carrying on (as the maid described it) like a madman.
      • “The most racking pangs succeeded: a grinding in the bones, deadly nausea, and a horror of the spirit that cannot be exceeded at the hour of birth or death.” (Chapter 10) Jekyll explains that the actual transformation into Hyde was painful at first.
      • “Instantly the spirit of hell awoke in me and raged. With a transport of glee, I mauled the unresisting body, tasting delight from every blow (chapter 10)
    • cy
      • "I am ashamed of my long tongue. Let us make a bargain never to refer to this again."
      • "The door, which was equipped with neither bell nor knocker..."
      • " fog rolled over the city in the small hours"shrouded by the fog, hiding its secrets. "the fog lifted a little and showed him a dingy street"  Secrets are becoming uncovered slowly, also utterson break down door
      • ‘this is a private matter, and I beg ofyou to let it sleep.’

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