James-Lange Theory

  • Created by: islaaa14
  • Created on: 03-12-18 18:14
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  • What is it?
    • James-Lange Theory
      • Negative Evaluation
        • Researchers are not convinced the theory is accurate, as for it to be correct, there would have to be separate and distinctive patterns of physiological arousal- which researchers haven't found.
        • Schachter and Singer suggested that it is not only physiological changes that happen whilst under threat, and that there is also a cognitive component. This means that when we experience the stimulation in the ANS, we also interpret the situation we are in, coming to a decision about it. It is these two things that lead to the emotion we experience, and there is research supporting this.
    • Our emotional reaction depends on how we interpret physical sensations when reacting to a stimulus.
      • Example: Upon encountering a grizzly bear, your sympathetic division of you autonomic nervous system may activate and cause symptoms such as an increasing heartbeat. This could lead you to think "My heart rate is increasing, I must be scared", thus making you anxious.
  • Positive Evaluation
    • It is relevant today as it has led researchers to further study this idea, which leads to results somewhat supporting part of the theory.
    • James-Lange Theory
      • Negative Evaluation
        • Researchers are not convinced the theory is accurate, as for it to be correct, there would have to be separate and distinctive patterns of physiological arousal- which researchers haven't found.
        • Schachter and Singer suggested that it is not only physiological changes that happen whilst under threat, and that there is also a cognitive component. This means that when we experience the stimulation in the ANS, we also interpret the situation we are in, coming to a decision about it. It is these two things that lead to the emotion we experience, and there is research supporting this.

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