Gender in Heart of Darkness and Derek Walcott's poetry

  • Created by: emi_dow
  • Created on: 12-10-18 14:00
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  • Representations of gender in Heart of Darkness and Walcott's poetry
    • Masculinity
      • The role of male characters
        • European
          • Seen as leaders
        • African
          • Appreciated only for their labour
        • The Narration is from a masculine persepctive
          • Masculine narrative
            • Link to Haggard's idea of a story for boys - no petticoats
            • Masculinity
              • The role of male characters
                • European
                  • Seen as leaders
                • African
                  • Appreciated only for their labour
                • The Narration is from a masculine persepctive
                  • Masculine narrative
                    • Link to Haggard's idea of a story for boys - no petticoats
                • Centred on male characters
                  • Viewed as more important than the women
                    • The lover in Schooners flight
                      • only as a sexual object
                    • Only sees the women from a masculine persepctive
                      • There has not been as much change in the role of women as there has in colonialism
        • Centred on male characters
          • Viewed as more important than the women
            • The lover in Schooners flight
              • only as a sexual object
            • Only sees the women from a masculine persepctive
              • There has not been as much change in the role of women as there has in colonialism
    • Identity of women
      • In relation only to men
        • Kurtz's mistress & intended - not named
      • Feminisation of Africa
        • Maternal and caring qualities
          • The harbour: they are seen to be welcoming - the narrator talking to his lover
            • "The Safe twilight which your calm hands gave"
        • Women are seen to represent Africa
          • Kurtz's mistress
          • The women in the poem 'Almond trees'
            • Describe the women as being like the trees
              • Feminine depictions of nature
                • In a Green Night
                  • The orange tree is seen as a woman
                    • Allusions to Catholicism and the Virgin Mary
                    • Symbolism of purity and fertility
                    • Also, Used to represent the fall of man and their redemption
                      • Reflects the crimes of the colonial era and its legacy
                        • "Each overburdened bough"
                          • The weight of the past
              • "Aged trees and oiled limbs share a common colour"
                • The shared heritage between the girls and the trees which came from Africa
              • "Forked limbs"
        • Feminine depictions of nature
          • In a Green Night
            • The orange tree is seen as a woman
              • Allusions to Catholicism and the Virgin Mary
              • Symbolism of purity and fertility
              • Also, Used to represent the fall of man and their redemption
                • Reflects the crimes of the colonial era and its legacy
                  • "Each overburdened bough"
                    • The weight of the past
      • Contrast between identity of African and European women
        • The intended is very frail and quite pathetic
        • The Mistress is confident and power
    • Sexism
      • Focus of physical descriptions of women
      • Their role - sexual objects
        • "Bright girls"
          • Suggestion of prostitution
        • Sexual objectification and abuse
      • The inherent sexism of colonisalism
        • Contemporary attitudes
        • The role of slave girls in 'ruins of a great house'
          • "Moth-like girls"
          • "Bright girls"
            • Suggestion of prostitution

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