How strong was Weimar Germany in the 1920's?

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  • Created on: 18-04-15 22:30
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  • How strong was Weimar Germany in the 1920's?
    • Legacy of Versailles.
      • Loss of land.
        • Danzig, Alsace-Lorraine and Polish corridor.
      • Reparations.
        • £6.6 billion.
      • War guilt clause.
      • Diktat.
    • Weimar constitution.
      • Proportional representation.
      • Presidency Article 48.
      • Freidrich Ebert, 1919.
      • President could dissolve the Reichstag and call a general election if he felt the political situation warranted it.
      • Federal state - Each region controlled internal laws.
      • Advantages
        • Article 48 ensured stability, e.g. hyperinflation.
        • A Bill of Rights guaranteed every German citizen freedom of speech and religion, and equality under the law.
      • Disadvantages
        • Many short-lived governments.
        • Many coalitions.
        • Article 48 could be misused, e.g. 1933.
        • Some regions became extremist hotspots, e.g Bavaria.
      • Uprisings
        • Kapp Putsch, 1920
          • Wolfgang Kapp opposed Ebert, right wing Freikorps movement. Ebert fled Berlin.
        • Invasion of the Ruhr, 1923
          • Hyperinflation, 1923
            • Rapidly increasing prices due to a plummeting currency.
          • Missed reparations payment, French and Belgian soldiers occupied Ruhr.
        • Munich Putsch, 1923
          • Hitler's attempt to overthrow the Weimar government of Ebert, and establish a right wing nationalistic one in its place.
        • Spartacist uprising, 1919.
          • Left wing radical socialists, thought Ebert and SDP were too moderate and generous to right wing politicians.
      • 'Golden years' - 1924 - 1929.
        • Gustav Stresemann.
          • Called off passive resistance in the Ruhr.
          • Introduced 'rentenmark', backed by US loans.
            • Dawes Plan, 1924.
          • Restarted reparation payments.
          • Helped improve foreign policy.
          • Young Plan, 1929.

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