History of medicine timeline

View mindmap
  • 323BC-500AD (Romans)
    • 500AD-1350 (Middle ages)
      • 1350-1750 (Renaissance)
        • 1750-1900 (Industrial revolution)
          • 1900+ (Present day)
            • 1899-1902
              • Boer war
                • A war fought by the British Empire in South Aftica
            • 1911
              • National Health Insurance Act
                • Part of the Liberal Social reforms and introduced unemployment benefit, free medical treatment and sickness pay.
            • 1914-1918
              • First World War
                • Between the triple entente (UK, France and Russia) and the triple alliance (Germany, Austria-Hungary and Italy)
            • 1939-1945
              • World War 2
                • Started when Germany attacked Poland
            • 1942
              • Beverage report
                • William Beverage wanted the government to stop the 'laissez-faire' attitude
            • 1948
              • NHS
                • This provided the public with free healthcare. This improved the public health and we still have it to this day
          • early 1800s
            • British public health debates
              • There was concern about the health of the public
              • contagionists and anti-contagionists believed different things
          • 1840
            • Spontaneous generation challenged
              • In 1840 Friedrich Henle was the first person to challenge the theory and suggest microbes were the cause of infection
              • The theory was dismissed at first
          • 1835
            • Specificity
              • The idea that microbes are different and that different microbes cause different diseases
          • 1857-1860
            • Pasteur's germ theory
              • The idea that microbes and germs caused diseases and infection, not the other way around
          • 1860
            • Joseph Lister
              • He found that operations went well as long as the wound was kept free of infection
          • 1864
            • Germ theory comes to britain
              • Thomas Wells was the first to suggest a non-chemical cause of infection/disease. He used germ theory
          • 1865
            • Lister's first experiment
              • Lister decided to use a chemical barrier to stop microbes from getting in- he used carbolic acid
          • 1866
            • The cattle plague
              • Outbreak of disease caused from cows. Farmers didn't want to kill them. To end the disease the cattle were eventually killed. This meant shortages of food
          • 1870
            • John Tindall publically supports germ theory
              • The main view was still spontaneous generation but people started to believe in the germ theory after this
          • 1874
            • Germ theory becoming accepted
              • more people were starting to believe this rather than spontaneous generation
          • 1876
            • Robert Koch advances germ theory
              • He was able to identify microbes such as anthrax thanks to the germ theory
          • 1879
            • Koch work translated to English
              • Meant more people started to accept the theory
          • 1880s
            • Germ theory accepted
          • 1890
            • Aseptic surgery
              • Being completely free of harmful microbes
          • 1830-1840
            • Cholera
              • This was a water-borne disease and caused many deaths as they didn't know the cause
          • 1858
            • The great stink
              • The heat wave in 1858 caused the government to invest in the underground sewers that are still in London
        • 1677
          • Microscopes invented
            • Allows scientist to see the tiny organisms moving about in water, food and animal and human body parts. No links were made.
        • 1700s
          • Spontaneous Generation
            • After discovering microbes in 1677, the main theory about how disease came about was spontaneous generation. This theory said that microbes appeared when something was diseased or rotting.
            • They believed all microbes were generally the same
            • It was the idea that diseases caused microbes, not the other way around
        • 1665
          • Great Plague
            • This killed around 100,000 people in London
      • 1348
        • Black Death
          • This was caused by fleas on rats but many believed God was punishing them for their sins
    • 1100Bc-323BC (Greeks)
      • Hippocrates' theory of the four humours
        • He believed illness was caused naturally not supernaturally

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar History resources:

See all History resources »See all Medicine through time (OCR History A) resources »