(Hardy/Eliot) Isolation

  • Created by: NHow02
  • Created on: 02-04-19 11:40
View mindmap
  • Isolation
    • Midnight on the Great Western
      • 'flame / played down'
        • Oxymoron (care-free, childlike action negated by reality)
          • Victorian middle-class view of children (they should be 'seen and not heard')
          • Victim of societal corruption (oxymoron suggests intermittent state)
      • 'your soul a sphere'
        • 'our rude realms far above'
          • Alliteration adds a harsher tone to the poem (adulthood= bitterness)
          • 'Our' pronouns suggests Hardy takes responsibility for society's corruption
            • Victorian England was famous for its rapid Industrialisation (Hardy was a romantic)
              • Hardy had a lot of respect for TS Eliot's work
          • 'far above' suggests boy is safe for the moment
            • Heaven is usually placed 'above' (reflects Hardy's atheist beliefs)
              • J. Clipper: 'Man is alone in the universe'
        • Sibilance creates a protective effect (or no corners to hide from corruption)
        • Soul is impenetrable
        • Repetition of 'Journeying boy' creates distance - reflecting on society
    • Animula
      • 'curl up the small soul in the window seat behind the Encyclopedia'
        • 'Encyclopedia' is a modernist image, suggests education
          • 'behind' creates a recessive/ backward effect
        • Continuous theme of lack of movement (Prufrock)
          • Poem follows a structure: in this section the 'soul withdraws from the world'
        • Sibilance emphasises he is letting life slip away
        • 'window' suggests enlightenment but is never opened
          • Watches others but does not act (ignorance was bliss)
        • Hadrian died having lived a full life. Now Eliot fears for his soul
          • 'the simple soul', (Dante's purgatory) a seeker of God who is deflected by daily trifles and follies.
    • Portrait of a Lady
      • 'Juliet's tomb'
        • Title alludes to novel by Henry James, which challenges expectations of women in society
        • Oxymoron creates a bereft effect (left a virgin)
          • Eliot uses Shakespeare's play to emphasise lack of communication leading to death
        • 'dying fall'
          • Opening speech of Twelfth Night is quoted at the end (beginnings/ ends)
            • Epigraph of Dante's Inferno used at the beginning of Prufrock (men & women)
              • 'love song' is personal/ intimate, but Eliot's persona suggests unrequited love
                • Eliot insists that poetry must be written with impersonal intent (not as himself)
          • Relationships are always doomed to fail (lack of communication)
    • A Game of Chess
      • 'Burnished throne'/ 'Philomel'
        • Allusion to Cleopatra's affair with Anthony (resulting in her suicide)
        • Philomel was ***** by a barbarous king and her tongue cut out (transformed into a nightingale by the Gods)
          • Eliot also uses the literary past to draw 'heat he could not derive from life'
        • Ancient stories of sexual destruction continued in modern society (sexual decay)
        • 'HURRY UP PLEASE ITS TIME'
          • Bustling pub scene draws upper + lower classes together
          • Everyone is running out of time - 'good night' means its too late
            • Reference to Hamlet and drowning of Ophelia
              • 'Fear death by water' - slow death (disappearing into nothingness)
          • Repeated sparsely at first then lines culminate rapidly at the end (climax of society)
          • 'I said'/ 'he said' - words, no action
    • The Phantom Horsewoman
      • 'draws reign and sings to the swing of the tide'
        • Punctuation pulls Hardy back and forth between fantasy and reality
          • e.g. 'bring -' & 'go...'
            • Emma grew up in Cornwall and loved the sea, but moved away once they were married
        • 'draws reign' stops the flow of the poem in the last line (only in death does she become his main focus)
          • First and last lines of every stanza could be a poem by itself (lost in his thoughts)
        • 'gaily' and 'shaly'
          • Half rhyme suggests he is losing grip on reality (emphasises distance between them)
            • Emma died in 1912, after a tumultuous relationship
            • Emma Gifford: Hardy 'understands only the women he invents'
          • Indented lines 2-8 are more list-like due to the restricted number of words
        • Rhythmic beat landing on words like 'sing','swing' & 'tide'
          • Grief has became a habit/routine (can't move on or forget)
            • Hynes: 'stoic regret of the irrevocable passage of time'
        • Romanticism (artistic/ literary movement which developed a deep love for nature & the supernatural)
          • Michael Cox believed that Victorians 'excelled' at Ghosts

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar English Literature resources:

See all English Literature resources »See all Thomas Hardy poems resources »