Functionalism and New Right on Education

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  • Functionalism and New Right on Education
    • General Ideas Of Functionalist
      • Functionalism is a consensus theory that is seen as being essentially harmonious.
      • Society needs basic norms and values in need for it to survive, this is called SOCIAL SOLIDARITY
      • Education is a social institute which helps keep society in order, as it helps socialise new members into society.
      • Functionalism is a conservative view. Conservatives believe that everyone in society should work for their money and housing etc. this is Meritocracy
    • Theories of Functionalist Sociologists.
      • Emile Durkheim believed that the major function of education was to pass the norms and values of one generation to the next.
      • Emile Durkheim believes this is necessary to achieve SOCIAL SOLIDARITY. This is when one person feels they belong to a community which is bigger then them.
      • Emile Durkheim also believed that education acts as a miniature society. The child learns to obey a fixed set of rules and to socialize, which is a preparation for adult life.
      • Talcott Parsons believed that education acts as a simple bridge from family life into the wider society.
      • Talcott Parsons also believed that education helps to socialise young people into the basic values of education. which are the value of achievement and the value of equal opportunity.
    • The New Right Perspective
      • Functionalist and New Right have similar views but New Right are more current but are political and are not sociologists.
      • They agree that with functionalists that education should be run by meritocratic principles.
      • They believe that education should socialise children into shared values and provide sense of National Identity.
      • Marketisation of education was introduced when The Education Reform Act was introduced. This is when schools act like businesses to try and recruit students for their school.


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