Frankenstein Revision Mindmap

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  • Frankenstein
    • Themes
      • Religion
        • 'Many times I considered Satan as the fitter emblem of my condition' - the Creature
        • 'I ought to be thy Adam; but I am rather the fallen angel' - The Creature.
          • The Creature is comparing himself to the devil. Whereas he should have been the perfect being being, he became an archetype fallen angel, like Lucifer.
      • Sexuality
      • Loss of Innocence
        • 'You seek for knowledge and wisdom, as I once did; and I ardently hope that the gratification of your wishes may not be a serpent to sting you, as mine has been.'
      • Travel
      • Obsession
        • '... my candle was nearly burnt out' - Victor Frankenstein.
          • The candle is a metaphor for his sanity.
      • Anguish
      • Scientific Advancement
      • Duality or The Double
      • Birth and Creation
        • New Species
        • '... he muttered some inarticulate sounds, while a grin wrinkled his cheeks' - Victor Frankenstein.
          • Victor compares his creation to a new born baby.
      • Power
      • Alienation
        • I have no friends'
        • Abhorred monster
        • I desire the company of man
        • 'I bitterly feel the want for a friend' - Robert Walton
        • Shunned and hated by all mankind
        • I abhorred the face of man
      • Vengence
        • 'No: from that moment I  declared ceverlasting war against the species' - The Creature.
        • 'When I looked around I saw and heard of none like me. Was I, a monster, a blot upon the earth from which all men fled and whom all mean disowned?' - The Creature.
      • The Dangers of Knowledge
        • 'Of what a strange nature is knowledge!'
          • The Creature realises that maybe all that he has learned is not for the better.
      • Family
        • ''... you, my creator'  - The Creature.
        • '... thy Creature, who implores thy goodness and compassion.'
          • The Creature only needed his creator, his father, to care for him. He was of a good nature until rejection.
      • Marriage
      • Death
      • Humanity
        • 'My soul glowed with love and humanity' - The Creature
      • Monstrosity
        • Humanity
          • 'My soul glowed with love and humanity' - The Creature
      • Good and Evil
        • 'Evil thenceforth became my good'
        • 'You accuse me of murder yet you would withva satisfied conscience destroy your own creature'.
      • Guilt
        • '... with this deadly weight yet hanging around my neck' - Victor Frankenstein.
          • 'Instead of the cross, the Albatross/About my neck was hung' - Samuel Coleridge, Time of the Ancient Mariener.
        • 'I felt the never dying worm alive in my bosom-
    • Female Characters
      • Elizabeth Lavarenza
        • Perhaps the most important emotional channel is Frankensteins betrothed Elisabeth. Describes as a submissive and gentle characters from the beguining, Frankenstein  views her as his possession.
          • 'I looked upon Elizabeth as mine- mine to protect, love and cheris.'
        • Angelic imagery is used to describe Elizabeth. It gives the impression that she is fragile and weak unlike the male characters who are strong not delicate.
        • The Creature is well aware isElizabeths inherent weakness and filled with the madness that stems from his parental neglect h, murders her in order to hurt his creator as deeply as possible. Even when her life was threatened, Frankenstein still holds the game of wits between himself and his monster above protecting Elizabeth.. Instead of staying with her and pro protecting her on his wearing night, he patrols the premesis.
          • It can be noted that noted that after her death elizabeth is no onger seen as an object hby victor
          • Elizabeth becomes another inert victim in this game of insanity and male centered mayhem.
        • The question 'Who is the real monster?' Is reoccurring throughout the novel. If Elizabeth was a round character then it would negate one side of the argument as her death would have insinuated that the creature was the real monster instead of the answer being left ambiguous.
      • Justine
        • Justine's character is a very passive, seldom vocal character in the novel and is ultimately framed for the murder of William. Justine defies the expectations of one wrongfully accused of manslaughter, remaining tranquillity and peaceful. Not only do her speech and actions demonstrsight passivity, but the simple act of being framed provesvthis to be the purpose of her character.
          • 'God knows how entirely I am innocent. But I do not pretend that my protestations should aquit me; I rest my innocence on a plain and simple explanation of the facts...'
      • Caroline Frankenstein
        • Caroline firstly gives up her life at the request of her father in order to support  him in his elderly poverty. It is not until Frankensteis father, Alphonse resques and marries her that she is able to live a comfortable and normallife.
        • Later Caroline devotes her time to personally care for the orphaned Elizabeth. An action which see's her altruistically give her life as though her care she catches scarlect feaver.
        • She is a Damsel in Distress Archetype as she needs to be resques by a man from a  dire predicament in which she- the persecuted maidren, is obtained after resques by Alphonse who gets her hand in marriage as a reward.
      • Safie
        • The monsters academic education occurs because of Safie. She arrives at the cottagers from Arabia and she must be tutored to learn English. The monster observes them and the happy family. Safies lessons become his as well. Thus because of this passive female, the monster's first academic education happens.It is inconsequential to the novel whether Safie herself learns the language as long as the lessons being taught to her are influencing and furthering the monster.
          • 'My day's were spent in close attention... and I may boast that I improved more rapidly than the Arabian... I could imitate almost every word that was spoken... I also learned the science of letters.'
      • Agatha Delacy
        • Agatha is the young daughter, whom the monster studie. Agetha's purpose, as a kind and  gentle female, is to exhibit and embody all virtue and sensitivity. Those are the first lessons learned by the monster; he has never seen such tenderness before now.
          • 'Agetha's listened with respect, her eyes sometimes filled with tears, which she endeavour ed to wipe away unpercieved'
      • Margret
        • Margret character has perhaps the most passive role of all. She is useful to us as an audience because without her there is no reason for Walton to relay his story. She is the most distant and passive female character in the novel and also the most character in the novel and also the most necessary to the novel as a whole.
      • The Female Creature
        • The Female Creature never lives. She is destroyed before taking her first breath. She is used as a devise and is only there as a function to Victor who uses her destruction to get his moral code in check and out himself on what he thinks is the right path. The male creature become s angery at this decision and this  creates conflict between the 2 makes.
      • The author characterises each woman as passive , disposable and serving a ulitarian function. Female characters provide nothing more but a channel of action for the male characters in the novel. Events and actions happen to then usually for the sake of teaching a male character a lesson or sparking an emotion in them. Shelly's woman are objectified, used, abused and easily disgaurded. Nonre of them, save Margret survive the novel and all of them live their fictional lives to serve a very specific function and impact a man's life.
        • An explanation for this is that there are so many controversial topics in the novel so pushing Feminism may have been too much for an 1818 audience on top of science and challenging religion/God.
    • Interpretation
      • Marxist Theory
        • Victor Frankenstein represents the ruling class. Victor himself is indeed an educated character from a wealthy business background. He is a creator, the owner of the means of production in that he owns the means of creation, for just as the Bourgeoisie creates the Proletariat, this doctor creates a monster that ends up attempting to kill him. Frankenstein is therefore a symbol for oppressive society.
        • Marx explained in his Communist Manifesto, only 2 true classes exist: the Bourgeoisie, or the owners or the means of production, and the Proletariat, or the working class.
        • The Creature is a symbol for the oppressed people. He is the Proletariat that revolt s against the Bourgeoisie. First, his composition reflects that of the Proletariat. He is created by the Bourgeoisie, and various different parts of that. His composition itself could be thought to be the Proletariat essence itself as the creatures body is made up from '
          • The Creature is larger than his creator. The doctor recalls - 'As the minutes of the part's formed a great hindrance to my speed, I resolved, contrary to my first intention, to make the being of a gigantic stature; that is to say, about eight feet in height, and proportion ally large'.The monsters stature reflects the population of the working class, which outnumbers the aristocrats.
            • Furthermore, he is tougher than the doctor, just like the Proletariat is stronger than the Bourgeoisie: he reminds his creator 'thou hssr made me more powerful than thyself: my height is superior to thine, my joints more suple'.
            • The monsters simple lifestyle reflects the lifestyle of the workers; he does not need the luxury of the aristocrats but only a meager amount of nutritious food and a simple bed.
      • Psychodynamic
      • Queer Theory
        • Psychodynamic
      • Feminist Theory
        • Female Characters
          • Elizabeth Lavarenza
            • Perhaps the most important emotional channel is Frankensteins betrothed Elisabeth. Describes as a submissive and gentle characters from the beguining, Frankenstein  views her as his possession.
              • 'I looked upon Elizabeth as mine- mine to protect, love and cheris.'
            • Angelic imagery is used to describe Elizabeth. It gives the impression that she is fragile and weak unlike the male characters who are strong not delicate.
            • The Creature is well aware isElizabeths inherent weakness and filled with the madness that stems from his parental neglect h, murders her in order to hurt his creator as deeply as possible. Even when her life was threatened, Frankenstein still holds the game of wits between himself and his monster above protecting Elizabeth.. Instead of staying with her and pro protecting her on his wearing night, he patrols the premesis.
              • It can be noted that noted that after her death elizabeth is no onger seen as an object hby victor
              • Elizabeth becomes another inert victim in this game of insanity and male centered mayhem.
            • The question 'Who is the real monster?' Is reoccurring throughout the novel. If Elizabeth was a round character then it would negate one side of the argument as her death would have insinuated that the creature was the real monster instead of the answer being left ambiguous.
          • Justine
            • Justine's character is a very passive, seldom vocal character in the novel and is ultimately framed for the murder of William. Justine defies the expectations of one wrongfully accused of manslaughter, remaining tranquillity and peaceful. Not only do her speech and actions demonstrsight passivity, but the simple act of being framed provesvthis to be the purpose of her character.
              • 'God knows how entirely I am innocent. But I do not pretend that my protestations should aquit me; I rest my innocence on a plain and simple explanation of the facts...'
          • Caroline Frankenstein
            • Caroline firstly gives up her life at the request of her father in order to support  him in his elderly poverty. It is not until Frankensteis father, Alphonse resques and marries her that she is able to live a comfortable and normallife.
            • Later Caroline devotes her time to personally care for the orphaned Elizabeth. An action which see's her altruistically give her life as though her care she catches scarlect feaver.
            • She is a Damsel in Distress Archetype as she needs to be resques by a man from a  dire predicament in which she- the persecuted maidren, is obtained after resques by Alphonse who gets her hand in marriage as a reward.
          • Safie
            • The monsters academic education occurs because of Safie. She arrives at the cottagers from Arabia and she must be tutored to learn English. The monster observes them and the happy family. Safies lessons become his as well. Thus because of this passive female, the monster's first academic education happens.It is inconsequential to the novel whether Safie herself learns the language as long as the lessons being taught to her are influencing and furthering the monster.
              • 'My day's were spent in close attention... and I may boast that I improved more rapidly than the Arabian... I could imitate almost every word that was spoken... I also learned the science of letters.'
          • Agatha Delacy
            • Agatha is the young daughter, whom the monster studie. Agetha's purpose, as a kind and  gentle female, is to exhibit and embody all virtue and sensitivity. Those are the first lessons learned by the monster; he has never seen such tenderness before now.
              • 'Agetha's listened with respect, her eyes sometimes filled with tears, which she endeavour ed to wipe away unpercieved'
          • Margret
            • Margret character has perhaps the most passive role of all. She is useful to us as an audience because without her there is no reason for Walton to relay his story. She is the most distant and passive female character in the novel and also the most character in the novel and also the most necessary to the novel as a whole.
          • The Female Creature
            • The Female Creature never lives. She is destroyed before taking her first breath. She is used as a devise and is only there as a function to Victor who uses her destruction to get his moral code in check and out himself on what he thinks is the right path. The male creature become s angery at this decision and this  creates conflict between the 2 makes.
          • The author characterises each woman as passive , disposable and serving a ulitarian function. Female characters provide nothing more but a channel of action for the male characters in the novel. Events and actions happen to then usually for the sake of teaching a male character a lesson or sparking an emotion in them. Shelly's woman are objectified, used, abused and easily disgaurded. Nonre of them, save Margret survive the novel and all of them live their fictional lives to serve a very specific function and impact a man's life.
            • An explanation for this is that there are so many controversial topics in the novel so pushing Feminism may have been too much for an 1818 audience on top of science and challenging religion/God.
      • Authorial
    • Setting
      • Russia. Artic. Geneva. Ingolstat. Church Yard. Laboratory/Cell. Bed Chamber's. Geneva. The Alps. *Creature Narrative*. *The Forset*. *The Delacey's Cottage*. England. Orkney. Island. Geneva. Artic.
      • The settings in the text range from isolated and remote places like the Artic. The comfort and safety of victors family home in Geneva ( which Shelly juxtaposes as she creates an ombiance of death around it). Gothic settings like the church yard and chardnal houses. And the sublime represented by the mountains that give victor clarity .
        • Shelly may have done this as these locations are far removed from the readers life. As in 1818 the opportunities to travel would have been slim to those that would reead her book.
      • This creates a circular Narrative
    • Significant Moments of Tention
      • The Creature Waking Up
      • Not knowing where the creature is.
      • Victor and the Creature meet face to face in the mountains.
      • The destruction of the Female Creature.
      • Victor and Elizabeth's Wedding Night.
      • The Resolution.
    • Purpose
      • A warning about the dangers of scientific advancement.
      • A Transgression Tale.
      • To entertain or scare
        • At the base of every story there is one purpose-built to entertain.
      • Authorial Interpretation.
        • It could be read as a Cathartic Exersise for Shelly after the deaths of her children.
    • Structure
      • Frame Narration
        • To show there is a didactive purpose to the novel.
          • 'Learn from me'
      • Epistolary
        • Creates Verisimilitude.
        • One sided voice.
          • Unreliable Narrative. As it is first person so the character narating is would be subject to bias due to there personal opinion or emotional state.
        • Creates Tention
      • Chinese Box Narrative.
        • Unreliable Narrative. As it is first person so the character narating is would be subject to bias due to there personal opinion or emotional state.
      • Detraspective/Analeptic.
    • Form
      • Novel
      • Gothic
      • Science Fiction
      • 19th Century Novel
    • Male Character's
      • Victor Frankenstein
      • The Creature
      • Alphonse Frankenstein
      • Henry Clerval
      • Robert Walton
    • Language
      • Descriptive
        • The language used in some chapters is graphic
          • Victors dream of Elizabeth's death
      • Monosyllabic and Polysyllabic
        • Puts forward the education and intelligence of the characters
          • The creatures speach pattern  when he is first'born' in comparison to when he converses with victor for the first time.
      • Archaic
        • The language is reflective of the time it was first published (1818).
      • Allusons
        • There are biblical allusions throughout
          • I should have been thy Adam but I am thine fallen angel..
          • Frankenstein llikens himself to God
      • Intertextuality
        • Paradise Lost
        • The Rhyme of the Ancient Marriener
        • Prometheus
      • High diction
      • Melodrama
    • Symbols
      • Nature
        • '... the season contributed greatly to my convalenses' - Victor Frankenstein.
      • Books
      • Fire and Ice
      • Light
        • Symbolises enlightenment.
          • 'a country of eternal light' - Walton
            • Walton expects to find the secrets of the universe unveiled in the North Pole.
      • The Characters
        • Elizabeth is a symbol for nieve
        • Victor is a symbol of extreme hubris
    • Context
      • Romanticism
      • Age of Enlightenment
      • The French Revolution
      • The Industrial Revolution
      • Mary Shelly
      • Atheism

Comments

Camtutor

only issue is it's so complete and detailed you can't read it once it's printed 

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