Forms of Intrusive Activity (Plate Tectonics and Hazards)

Refers to AQA A2 Geography - Plate Tectonics and assosiated hazards.

A mind map relating to the formation of intrusive activity (volcanoes).

This came up as an 8 mark question recently so might be worth a look.

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  • Forms of Intrusive Volcanic Activity
    • Dykes
      • Dykes are steep, sheet like intrusions.
      • They occupy vertical weaknesses in the rock, often cutting across rock bedding and forming low ridges.
      • Visible on Isle of Arran, Scotland.
      • They vary from a few mm across to tens of metres.
    • Sills
      • Sills are layers of igneous rock that follow the bedding of sedimentary rock layers.
      • e.g. the Great Whin Sill, Northern Ireland.
      • Visible on Isle of Arran, Scotland.
    • Batholiths
      • Like oil in water, deep-seated masses of magma may rise as huge blobs. They solidify within a few km of the surface to form plutons.
        • They may be added to over millions of years to form batholiths.
          • Some may reach over 1000km in length.
            • e.g. giant batholith underlying the South West of England from Dartmoor to Lands End.
      • e.g. giant batholith underlying the South West of England from Dartmoor to Lands End.
    • Formation
      • Sometimes, rising magma never reaches the surface as it is intruded into weaknesses in the rocks and then cools down later.
      • When softer rock above the intrusion was eroded away, they often become prominent features of the landscape.
        • Sometimes, rising magma never reaches the surface as it is intruded into weaknesses in the rocks and then cools down later.
  • They vary from a few mm across to tens of metres.

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