Formation of Relationships (WJEC)

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  • Formation of Relationships
    • Matching Hypothesis: We choose people who are the same level of physical attractiveness as ourselves
      • Walster (1966): Dance study: 376 students independently judged on physical attractiveness and social desirability. Randomly assigned dates.
        • Did not support Matching Hypothesis
      • Walster & Walster (1969) Dance Study repeated: However students were able to meet beforehand and we allowed more time to think of their perfect mate
        • Did support Matching Hypothesis.
      • Murstein (1972): examined photographs of engaged and dating couples and found the pair were similar in levels of physical attracivenss
        • Did support Matching Hypothesis
      • Evaluation: Towhey (1979): males and females were asked to judge how they thought they would like a person dependant on a photograph and their geographical location
        • Those who scored higher on the macho scale were more influenced by physical attractiveness compared to those who scored lower on the macho scale who almost ignored physical attractiveness
      • Matching Hypothesis includes other attractive features such as intelligence and wealth
    • Social Exchange Theory: All relationships work on a cost - rewards scale
      • Thaibult & Kelley (1959): argued four stages: 1: Sampling 2: Bargaining 3: Commitment  4: Insitutalisation
      • Suggests that those with more previous bad relationships will put up with more
      • Hartfeild (1979):  found that an overprivaliged partner felt guilt while an underprivileged partner had the lowest level of satisfaction
        • Married couples had the highest level of satisfaction
      • Evaluation: Theory assumes that everyone is selfish and self centered and applies more to a casual relationship
        • Rewards matter more to females than males
    • Socio - Biological Theory: The survival of genes
      • Suggests that males and females seek relationships who are more likely to produce healthy children but men prefer younger females who are more fertile
      • Applies to families (Kin Selection)
      • Fellner & Marshall (1981)
        • 86% Of Parents would give a kidney for a child
        • 67% of children would give a kidney for a parent
        • 50% of children would give a kidney to a sibling
  • Socio - Biological Theory: The survival of genes
    • Suggests that males and females seek relationships who are more likely to produce healthy children but men prefer younger females who are more fertile
    • Applies to families (Kin Selection)
    • Fellner & Marshall (1981)
      • 86% Of Parents would give a kidney for a child
      • 67% of children would give a kidney for a parent
      • 50% of children would give a kidney to a sibling

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