The formation of hydrogencarbonate ions

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  • Formation of hydrogencarbonate ions
    • 1. as carbon dioxide DIFFUSES into the blood, some of it enters the RED BLOOD CELLS
      • 2. from here, the carbon dioxide combines with water to form a weak acid called CARBONIC ACID
        • 3.This is then CATALYSED by an enzyme called CARBONIC ANHYDRASE
          • 4. the CARBONIC ACID dissociates to release HYDROGEN IONS (H+) and HYDROGENCARBONATE IONS (HC03-)
            • 5.the HYDRO CARBONATE Ions DIFFUSE out of the RED BLOOD CELL and into the PLASMA
              • 6.Charge inside the RED BLOOD CELL is MAINTAINED by the movement of CHLORIDE IONS (CL-) from the PLASMA into the RED BLOOD CELL
  • 2. from here, the carbon dioxide combines with water to form a weak acid called CARBONIC ACID
    • 3.This is then CATALYSED by an enzyme called CARBONIC ANHYDRASE
      • 4. the CARBONIC ACID dissociates to release HYDROGEN IONS (H+) and HYDROGENCARBONATE IONS (HC03-)
        • 5.the HYDRO CARBONATE Ions DIFFUSE out of the RED BLOOD CELL and into the PLASMA
          • 6.Charge inside the RED BLOOD CELL is MAINTAINED by the movement of CHLORIDE IONS (CL-) from the PLASMA into the RED BLOOD CELL
  • CHLORIDE SHIFT
    • Hydrogen ions = very ACIDIC contents of red blood cell
    • HIGH ACIDITY IS PREVENTED BY:  hydrogen ions being taken up by HAEMOGLOBIN to produce:
      • HAEMOGLOBINIC ACID
      • HAEMOGLOBIN acts as a BUFFER (a compound that can maintain a constant pH
        • Hydrogen ions = very ACIDIC contents of red blood cell
    • HAEMOGLOBINIC ACID
    • HAEMOGLOBIN acts as a BUFFER (a compound that can maintain a constant pH

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