Finacial pressures for change 1780-1834 Paupers and Puperism

  • Created by: katy127
  • Created on: 21-06-19 14:09
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  • Financial pressures for change
    • Wars with France
      • Harvests of 1813 & 1814 were good in England and on the continent.
        • Cheap corn was imported which cause our farmers' prices to be kept low
          • Problems: war time taxes had to be paid, interest on loans. There was very little work for labourers meaning many had to ask for relief.
    • Agricultural unrest: The 'Swing' Riots
      • Arson attacks occurred repeatedly. Poor and workhouses were burned down and demands for increased relief were made.
        • Sussex: movement against overseers of the poor. Gentry agreed to demands of increased allowances and removal of an assistant overseer
        • Hampshire: combined operation against threshing machines, tithes and overseers of the poor.
        • Wiltshire: John Bennett MP made a harsh allowance scale for poor relief in 1817. in 1830 he became target to violent protests.
      • Authorities thought the riots were organized after letters were sent by 'Captain Swing'. This led to the home secretary ordering the threat be dealt with.
        • 19 rioters sentenced to death, 400 sentenced to transportation to Australia, 644 imprisoned, 7 fined, 1 whipped and 800 acquitted.
      • Swing riots created a political climate in parliament, where reform of the poor laws was becoming more than a possibility: it was an urgent necessity.
    • Increasing cost of providing poor relief
      • Cost of poor relief was increasing at an alarming rate
      • Traditionally parishes looked after their own and raised money to do so. it worked well in stable conditions
        • early 19th century society was unstable. the underclass was enlarged and thousands crossed the line from poor to pauper.
          • This was made worse by the mobility of the population. hundreds crowded into parishes and claimed poor relief that parishes couldn't afford to provide.
      • The poor were increasingly idle which increased poor rates
      • Revolutionary potential fear heightened and whether a parish was urban, rural or anything in between, the overall cost to the nation of poor relief was rising.
  • Post-war distress meant the highest numbers of people claimed relief and saw it as a right.
    • People didn't like the Corn Law as it kept the price of bread high. Riots broke out as people could not afford bread.
    • Problems: war time taxes had to be paid, interest on loans. There was very little work for labourers meaning many had to ask for relief.
  • Riots started in over 20 counties (mainly southern and eastern England)
    • The poor demanded higher wages and the removal of steam-powered machines that did autumn and winter work
    • Agricultural unrest: The 'Swing' Riots
      • Arson attacks occurred repeatedly. Poor and workhouses were burned down and demands for increased relief were made.
        • Sussex: movement against overseers of the poor. Gentry agreed to demands of increased allowances and removal of an assistant overseer
        • Hampshire: combined operation against threshing machines, tithes and overseers of the poor.
        • Wiltshire: John Bennett MP made a harsh allowance scale for poor relief in 1817. in 1830 he became target to violent protests.
      • Authorities thought the riots were organized after letters were sent by 'Captain Swing'. This led to the home secretary ordering the threat be dealt with.
        • 19 rioters sentenced to death, 400 sentenced to transportation to Australia, 644 imprisoned, 7 fined, 1 whipped and 800 acquitted.
      • Swing riots created a political climate in parliament, where reform of the poor laws was becoming more than a possibility: it was an urgent necessity.

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