Feminism and Crime

Not everything, but a lot of the feminism content.

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  • Feminism and Crime
    • Deferential Socialisation
      • Socialised into a pattern of values which stress that women are not violent or aggressive etc.
    • Social Control
      • Expected to base themselves in the home
      • Male monopoly of violence - women discouraged from violence
      • The reputation of a woman is at risk of being labelled
    • Opportunity to Commit Crime
      • Shielded from opportunities to commit crime
        • Surveillance
        • Limited career
        • In the home more often than men
    • Malestream and invisibility of women
      • Ignored by  male dominant sociologists
        • Victimisation of domestic or sexual abuse ignored by statistics
      • Victimisation of domestic or sexual abuse ignored by statistics
    • Heidensohn - Patriarchal Control Theory
      • Lower crime rates because woman live more constrained lives
      • Crime by women is often seen as double deviance as it is also unfeminine.
      • Malestream and invisibility of women
        • Ignored by  male dominant sociologists
      • Messerschmidt - The Importance of 'Masculinity''
        • The main motivation behind crime committed by men is to show their masculinity
        • Hegemonic and subordinate mascuilinity
      • Carlen - Control Theory
        • Working-class women have to make the 'class deal' and 'gender deal'
        • Women will conform to these 'deals', but most likely in 'respectable' homes with a male breadwinner and female carer
      • Smart - Transgression
        • Self-imposed curfews, treatment of women as victims and the fear of crime.
        • Looked at how women were treated in the legal system with cases of rape etc
        • How does criminology affect feminists?
    • Self-imposed curfews, treatment of women as victims and the fear of crime.

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