York failed in his duty as Protector (1453-1455) (25 marks)

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  • Failure of York's duty as Protector
    • York failed to ensure the STABILITY of govt.
      • This was because he fell short of enlisting all but a handful of nobles.
        • Majority of noble families stopped to openly support York (to remain 'aloof and cautious).
          • Despite his attempts to present himself as the champion of JUSTICE and ENEMY of corruption.
    • York was not able, or didn't want, to deal with the Battle of St Albans independently.
      • This was because York blamed Somerset for the Battle.
        • Indicates that York tried to transfer his responsibility, rather than claiming any failure for himself. (weakness),
      • Despite his short term success of forcing Henry VI's men to negotiate in the Battle.
    • Other factors contributing to York's failure as Protector
      • Margaret of Anjou
        • When Henry VI suffered his breakdown, she assumed a more active political role.
        • She took York's power as Protector
          • Suggesting she wouldn't let York do his job properly, and gave him no choice but to give his power away.
            • Showing York did not completely fail as Protector.
          • However, this shows York was WEAK
            • This was because he couldn't stand his authority against a woman
              • Unusual, as women, (even Queens) were seen as 2nd class citizens, who were completely dependent  upon and answered to men, in 1400s.
      • However, this shows York was WEAK
        • This was because he couldn't stand his authority against a woman
          • Unusual, as women, (even Queens) were seen as 2nd class citizens, who were completely dependent  upon and answered to men, in 1400s.
      • Henry VI RECOVERY in December 1454.
        • This brought an end to York's role as Protectorate.
          • This was also due to Margaret's persuasion to Henry VI to exclude York from decision making.
            • This meant that Henry VI was now able to rule himself, and no longer needed him.
            • Shows Henry VI as weak, as he publicly recognized York's importance as Protector.
              • Suggests York was successful to an extent, as his work was liked by the King.
          • Shows that it may NOT have been York's actions that ultimately caused his filure.
            • This was also due to Margaret's persuasion to Henry VI to exclude York from decision making.
              • This meant that Henry VI was now able to rule himself, and no longer needed him.
              • Shows Henry VI as weak, as he publicly recognized York's importance as Protector.
                • Suggests York was successful to an extent, as his work was liked by the King.

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