socalised into their disabled identity.

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  • Evidence of people being socalised into their 'Disabled Identity'
    • Learned helplessness
      • Disabled people may respond to the constant assumption that they are helpless and dependent by developing low self-esteem and worth. This is what sociologist Watson (1998) discovered in his research.
      • This is also known as the self fulfilling prophecy. So for example if somebody gives you a negative label, you internalise the label and live up to what people think of you. This was illustrated in Scott’s study in 1969. He studied blind people. After observing the interaction between medical professionals and blind people in the USA, Scott argued that the blind developed a ‘blind personality’ because they internalised the expert's view that they should be experiencing psychological problems in adjusting to the loss of sight.
    • resistance
      • Recent sociological studies suggest that the disabled identity may now be underpinned by the social model of disability, and that disabled people are more likely to resist those definitions of disability that stress dependence and helplessness.
      • ANTLE (2000) found that children with disabilities do not differ in their personal views and opinions in how they see themselves compared with children without disabilities.
        • ONLE & KIM (2001) argue that the disabled people in their study felt positive about their disability despite their awareness that people without disabilities negatively evaluated them they rejected the medical labels and had a very positive self-image
    • Victim-blaming mentality (Shakespeare, 1996)
      • Disabled people are often socalised into this way of seeing themselves as victims.
        • Also that the person with impairment may have an investment in their own incapacity, because it can become the rationale for their own failure, therefore creating a 'victim mentality'
          • Victim-blaming mentality (Shakespeare, 1996)
            • Disabled people are often socalised into this way of seeing themselves as victims.
              • Also that the person with impairment may have an investment in their own incapacity, because it can become the rationale for their own failure, therefore creating a 'victim mentality'

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