Evaluation of Anger Management

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  • Evaluation of Anger Management
    • Ireland (2000) looked at young male offenders in the UK using self-report and assessments finding an overall reduction in the anger that the participants said they felt after completing the programme.
    • McDougall et al (1987) which used 18 young offenders undertaking an anger management programme found that offences were reduced which satisfies one of the aims to the anger management programme - to reduce recidivism.
    • Losel argues that to some extent, anger management programmes do work. Losel conducted a meta-analysis of 500 studies into anger management programmes and found that there was a 10% decrease in recidivism.
    • Loza and Loza-Fanous (1999) no significant correlation between anger and violent or non-violent offences.
    • Goldstein et al (1989) found that 15% of those that undertook an anger management programme and social skills training reoffended compared to 43% of those within a control group that were arrested again after being released.
    • Towl and Dexter (1994) - 9 AMP's - reported a decrease but it was later found that only 6 experienced a decrease
    • prisoners may falsely appear to be making progress but in fact, the issue of anger is not actually being addresses
    • offenders have to be self-motivated and wanting to change
    • increase in both verbal and emotional aggression/abuse
    • expensive form of treatment and can be considered time consuming
    • Other forensic psychologist may prefer token economy programmes as a form of treating offenders because it is cheaper and there is no need for a trained individual.
    • Aims to change the behaviour of the individual permanently to reduce recidivism
    • Studies into anger management programmes are considered high in validity as they use self-report data from the prisoners themselves
  • Ireland (2000) looked at young male offenders in the UK using self-report and assessments finding an overall reduction in the anger that the participants said they felt after completing the programme.

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