Ethnicity and Crime

HideShow resource information
  • Created by: HLOldham
  • Created on: 30-04-16 11:40
View mindmap
  • Ethnicity and Crime
    • African-Caribbean people and Asian people are over-represented in the official statistics and prison population
    • 2001-2001 Home Office
      • Black people were 8 times more likely to be stopped and searched than whites
      • Ethnic minorities are more likely than whites to be victims of crime
      • Police record about 50,000 radically motivated crimes each yeat
        • Many others go unreported or unrecorded
      • Black men are more likely to receive a custodial sentence for a similar offence, and to receive a longer sentence for it
    • Prison Rates
      • Ethnic minorities are over-represented in prisons
      • Black British prisoners form about 19% of the total prison population, about 7 times higher than would be expected in terms of their presence of the population
      • HOWEVER... self-report studies suggest that ethnic minorities have lower rates of offending
    • Why?
      • POLICE TARGETS - 6x more likely to be stopped & searched than whites
        • Philips and Bowing (2007), since the 70s the black community have been over-policed
      • DIVERSITY OF AREAS - more likely to police deprived areas
      • Ethnic minorities make up a large proportion of the underclass (strain theory)
      • INSTITUTIONAL RACISM - stereotypes
      • SOCIAL THEORY - labeling theory and moral panics
        • Media/police opinions/ public opinions
      • SUBCULTURES - due to social isolation in mainstream society
    • Facts
      • Recorded crime only provides a partial view of crime
      • It is hard to investigate whether the CJS is racist
      • To investigate the CJS you would need more self-report studies and other comparable data to make a judgement
      • This is not available
        • To investigate the CJS you would need more self-report studies and other comparable data to make a judgement
        • Methodological problems

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Sociology resources:

See all Sociology resources »See all Crime and deviance resources »