Emily Dickinson's Life

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  • Emily Dickinson's life and work
    • Born December 10 1830 Died May 15 1886
    • Personal Life
      • Her childhood and youth was filled with schooling, reading, exploration of nature, religious activites, significant firendships
        • Deaths of friends and relatives, such as her cousin Sophia Holland prompted questions about death and immorality
          • Close proximity to town cemetery and frequent burials influenced her work
      • Her most intense writing years consumed the decade of her late 20s and early 30s, when she wrote over 1100 poems
        • Writing became increasingly important in her early 20s
          • Ltters to her brother revealed a growing sense of difference between herself and others
            • "What makes a few of us so different from others? Its a question I often ask myself"
        • The writing Years (1855-1865)
          • Personal Life
            • Her childhood and youth was filled with schooling, reading, exploration of nature, religious activites, significant firendships
              • Deaths of friends and relatives, such as her cousin Sophia Holland prompted questions about death and immorality
                • Close proximity to town cemetery and frequent burials influenced her work
            • Her most intense writing years consumed the decade of her late 20s and early 30s, when she wrote over 1100 poems
              • Writing became increasingly important in her early 20s
                • Ltters to her brother revealed a growing sense of difference between herself and others
                  • "What makes a few of us so different from others? Its a question I often ask myself"
              • The writing Years (1855-1865)
                • Letters from 1858 and early 1861 indicate a serious and troubled romantic atachment that some scholars believe drove Dickinson's creative output.
                • Her last visits out of Amherst were in 1865, when she underwent treatment for a painful eye condition
                • Significant fiendships such as those with Samuel Bowles, Rev. Edward Dwight and Rev. Charles Wadsworth changed during this time, and Dickinson began to feel an increasing need for  a "preceptor" to cope with her outpouring of verse with questions about publications
                • 1864- Five of the Dickinson poems known to have been published in her lifetime appear in newspapers, including the Drum Beat, the Brooklyn Daily Union, and the Round Table
                • Dickinson begins collecting her poems into small packers, "fascicles". This practice continues until 1846.
                • 1855, Family moves back to repurchased and remodelled Homestead
            • Lived in Amhurst,had a fond attachment to her house in North Pleasant Street
            • Exceptional education for a young Newv England woman in the 19th century,
              • Attended Amherst Academy before entering Mount Holyoke Female Seminary in 1847, for one year
            • Later Years
              • Many strong friendships with females
              • Although she was a recluse, she entetained significant visitors such as Thomas Wentworth Higginson
                • Her definition of poetry "If I read a book and it makes my body so cold no fire can warm me I know that is poetry. If I feel physically as if the top of my head were taken off, I know that is poetry. These are the only way I know it. Is there any other way?"
              • Was romantically involved with Judge Otis Phillips Lord, a friend of her father
                • Drafts of letters to Lord suggest she considered marrying him, though she never did
              • Marked by lllness and death
                • Father's death in 1874, Mother's stroke in 1875, Nephew Gib's death, age 8, in 1883, Otis Lord's death in 1884, Helen Hunt Jackson;s death in 1885
                • Ill after nephew died, " The crisis of the sorrow of so many years is all that tires me
                • Remained in poor death until she died aged 55, buried in town cemetery
              • Peoms by Emily Dickinson, edited by Mabel Loomis Todd and T.W Higginson is published by Roberts Brother's of Boston
            • Never married
              • Evidence she received a marriage proposal from George H. Gould, a graduate of Amherst College
          • Letters from 1858 and early 1861 indicate a serious and troubled romantic atachment that some scholars believe drove Dickinson's creative output.
          • Her last visits out of Amherst were in 1865, when she underwent treatment for a painful eye condition
          • Significant fiendships such as those with Samuel Bowles, Rev. Edward Dwight and Rev. Charles Wadsworth changed during this time, and Dickinson began to feel an increasing need for  a "preceptor" to cope with her outpouring of verse with questions about publications
          • 1864- Five of the Dickinson poems known to have been published in her lifetime appear in newspapers, including the Drum Beat, the Brooklyn Daily Union, and the Round Table
          • Dickinson begins collecting her poems into small packers, "fascicles". This practice continues until 1846.
          • 1855, Family moves back to repurchased and remodelled Homestead
      • Lived in Amhurst,had a fond attachment to her house in North Pleasant Street
      • Exceptional education for a young Newv England woman in the 19th century,
        • Attended Amherst Academy before entering Mount Holyoke Female Seminary in 1847, for one year
      • Later Years
        • Many strong friendships with females
        • Although she was a recluse, she entetained significant visitors such as Thomas Wentworth Higginson
          • Her definition of poetry "If I read a book and it makes my body so cold no fire can warm me I know that is poetry. If I feel physically as if the top of my head were taken off, I know that is poetry. These are the only way I know it. Is there any other way?"
        • Was romantically involved with Judge Otis Phillips Lord, a friend of her father
          • Drafts of letters to Lord suggest she considered marrying him, though she never did
        • Marked by lllness and death
          • Father's death in 1874, Mother's stroke in 1875, Nephew Gib's death, age 8, in 1883, Otis Lord's death in 1884, Helen Hunt Jackson;s death in 1885
          • Ill after nephew died, " The crisis of the sorrow of so many years is all that tires me
          • Remained in poor death until she died aged 55, buried in town cemetery
        • Peoms by Emily Dickinson, edited by Mabel Loomis Todd and T.W Higginson is published by Roberts Brother's of Boston
      • Never married
        • Evidence she received a marriage proposal from George H. Gould, a graduate of Amherst College

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